skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS

Abstract

We use time-series ultraviolet full sun images to construct limb-synoptic maps of the Sun. On these maps, large-scale, long-lived coronal streamers appear as repetitive sinusoid-like arcs projected over the polar regions. They are caused by high altitude plasma produced from sunspot-rich regions at latitudes generally far from the poles. The non-uniform longitudinal distribution of these streamers reveals four longitudinal zones at the surface of the Sun from which sunspots erupt preferentially over the 5 year observing interval (2006 January to 2011 April). Spots in these zones (or clusters) have individual lifetimes short compared to the lifetimes of the coronal features which they sustain, and they erupt at different times. The four sunspot clusters contain >75% of all numbered sunspots in this period. They occupy two distinct longitudinal zones separated by {approx}180{sup 0} and each spanning {approx}100{sup 0} in longitude. The rotation rates of the spot clusters are {approx}5% faster than the rates at both the surface and the bottom of the convection zone. While no convincing theoretical framework exists to interpret the sunspot clusters in the longitude-time space, their persistent and nonuniform distribution indicates long-lived, azimuthal structures beneath the surface, and are compatible with the existence of previously reported activemore » longitudes on the Sun.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21578377
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 735; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/735/2/130; Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; CONVECTION; IMAGES; MAPS; PHOTOSPHERE; ROTATION; SOLAR CORONA; SUN; SUNSPOTS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; ATMOSPHERES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ENERGY TRANSFER; HEAT TRANSFER; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; MASS TRANSFER; MOTION; RADIATIONS; SOLAR ACTIVITY; SOLAR ATMOSPHERE; STARS; STARSPOTS; STELLAR ACTIVITY; STELLAR ATMOSPHERES; STELLAR CORONAE

Citation Formats

Li Jing, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu. ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/735/2/130.
Li Jing, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu. ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/735/2/130.
Li Jing, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu. Sun . "ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/735/2/130.
@article{osti_21578377,
title = {ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS},
author = {Li Jing, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu},
abstractNote = {We use time-series ultraviolet full sun images to construct limb-synoptic maps of the Sun. On these maps, large-scale, long-lived coronal streamers appear as repetitive sinusoid-like arcs projected over the polar regions. They are caused by high altitude plasma produced from sunspot-rich regions at latitudes generally far from the poles. The non-uniform longitudinal distribution of these streamers reveals four longitudinal zones at the surface of the Sun from which sunspots erupt preferentially over the 5 year observing interval (2006 January to 2011 April). Spots in these zones (or clusters) have individual lifetimes short compared to the lifetimes of the coronal features which they sustain, and they erupt at different times. The four sunspot clusters contain >75% of all numbered sunspots in this period. They occupy two distinct longitudinal zones separated by {approx}180{sup 0} and each spanning {approx}100{sup 0} in longitude. The rotation rates of the spot clusters are {approx}5% faster than the rates at both the surface and the bottom of the convection zone. While no convincing theoretical framework exists to interpret the sunspot clusters in the longitude-time space, their persistent and nonuniform distribution indicates long-lived, azimuthal structures beneath the surface, and are compatible with the existence of previously reported active longitudes on the Sun.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/735/2/130},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 735,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}