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Title: A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS

Abstract

We describe an updated version of our hybrid N-body-coagulation code for planet formation. In addition to the features of our 2006-2008 code, our treatment now includes algorithms for the one-dimensional evolution of the viscous disk, the accretion of small particles in planetary atmospheres, gas accretion onto massive cores, and the response of N-bodies to the gravitational potential of the gaseous disk and the swarm of planetesimals. To validate the N-body portion of the algorithm, we use a battery of tests in planetary dynamics. As a first application of the complete code, we consider the evolution of Pluto-mass planetesimals in a swarm of 0.1-1 cm pebbles. In a typical evolution time of 1-3 Myr, our calculations transform 0.01-0.1 M{sub sun} disks of gas and dust into planetary systems containing super-Earths, Saturns, and Jupiters. Low-mass planets form more often than massive planets; disks with smaller {alpha} form more massive planets than disks with larger {alpha}. For Jupiter-mass planets, masses of solid cores are 10-100 M{sub +}.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Utah, 201 JFB, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)
  2. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21574709
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 731; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/731/2/101
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ALGORITHMS; EVOLUTION; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES; PLANETS; ATMOSPHERES; MATHEMATICAL LOGIC

Citation Formats

Bromley, Benjamin C., and Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu. A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/731/2/101.
Bromley, Benjamin C., & Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu. A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/731/2/101.
Bromley, Benjamin C., and Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu. 2011. "A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/731/2/101.
@article{osti_21574709,
title = {A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS},
author = {Bromley, Benjamin C. and Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu},
abstractNote = {We describe an updated version of our hybrid N-body-coagulation code for planet formation. In addition to the features of our 2006-2008 code, our treatment now includes algorithms for the one-dimensional evolution of the viscous disk, the accretion of small particles in planetary atmospheres, gas accretion onto massive cores, and the response of N-bodies to the gravitational potential of the gaseous disk and the swarm of planetesimals. To validate the N-body portion of the algorithm, we use a battery of tests in planetary dynamics. As a first application of the complete code, we consider the evolution of Pluto-mass planetesimals in a swarm of 0.1-1 cm pebbles. In a typical evolution time of 1-3 Myr, our calculations transform 0.01-0.1 M{sub sun} disks of gas and dust into planetary systems containing super-Earths, Saturns, and Jupiters. Low-mass planets form more often than massive planets; disks with smaller {alpha} form more massive planets than disks with larger {alpha}. For Jupiter-mass planets, masses of solid cores are 10-100 M{sub +}.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/731/2/101},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 731,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 4
}
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