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Title: DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770

Abstract

The galaxy NGC 2770 hosted two core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions, SN 2008D and SN 2007uy, within 10 days of each other and 9 years after the first SN of the same type, SN 1999eh, was found in that galaxy. In particular, SN 2008D attracted a lot of attention due to the detection of an X-ray outburst, which has been hypothesized to be caused by either a (mildly) relativistic jet or the SN shock breakout. We present an extensive study of the radio emission from SN 2008D and SN 2007uy: flux measurements with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, covering {approx}600 days with observing frequencies ranging from 325 MHz to 8.4 GHz. The results of two epochs of global Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations are also discussed. We have examined the molecular gas in the host galaxy NGC 2770 with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope, and present the implications of our observations for the star formation and seemingly high SN rate in this galaxy. Furthermore, we discuss the near-future observing possibilities of the two SNe and their host galaxy at low radio frequencies with the Low Frequency Array.

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9]; ;  [10]; ;  [11];  [12];  [13]
  1. Space Science Office, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)
  2. Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  3. Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)
  4. University of Maryland, Department of Astronomy, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)
  5. International Centre for Radio Astronomical Research, University of Western Australia, 7 Fairway, Crawley, 6009 (Australia)
  6. University of New Mexico, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MSC07 4220, 800 Yale Blvd., NE Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)
  7. Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)
  8. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  9. National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Post Bag 3, Ganeshkind, Pune 411007 (India)
  10. Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)
  11. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)
  12. Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, Ganeshkhind, Post Bag No. 4 (India)
  13. Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College of London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21567656
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 726; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/99
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; EMISSION; EXPLOSIONS; GALAXIES; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; STAR EVOLUTION; SUPERNOVAE; BINARY STARS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ERUPTIVE VARIABLE STARS; EVOLUTION; RADIATIONS; STARS; VARIABLE STARS

Citation Formats

Van der Horst, A. J., Kouveliotou, C., Kamble, A. P., Wijers, R. A. M. J., Strom, R. G., Rol, E., Paragi, Z., Sage, L. J., Pal, S., Taylor, G. B., Granot, J., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Ishwara-Chandra, C. H., Oosterloo, T. A., Garrett, M. A., Wiersema, K., Starling, R. L. C., Bhattacharya, D., and Curran, P. A., E-mail: Alexander.J.VanDerHorst@nasa.gov. DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/99.
Van der Horst, A. J., Kouveliotou, C., Kamble, A. P., Wijers, R. A. M. J., Strom, R. G., Rol, E., Paragi, Z., Sage, L. J., Pal, S., Taylor, G. B., Granot, J., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Ishwara-Chandra, C. H., Oosterloo, T. A., Garrett, M. A., Wiersema, K., Starling, R. L. C., Bhattacharya, D., & Curran, P. A., E-mail: Alexander.J.VanDerHorst@nasa.gov. DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/99.
Van der Horst, A. J., Kouveliotou, C., Kamble, A. P., Wijers, R. A. M. J., Strom, R. G., Rol, E., Paragi, Z., Sage, L. J., Pal, S., Taylor, G. B., Granot, J., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Ishwara-Chandra, C. H., Oosterloo, T. A., Garrett, M. A., Wiersema, K., Starling, R. L. C., Bhattacharya, D., and Curran, P. A., E-mail: Alexander.J.VanDerHorst@nasa.gov. Mon . "DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/99.
@article{osti_21567656,
title = {DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770},
author = {Van der Horst, A. J. and Kouveliotou, C. and Kamble, A. P. and Wijers, R. A. M. J. and Strom, R. G. and Rol, E. and Paragi, Z. and Sage, L. J. and Pal, S. and Taylor, G. B. and Granot, J. and Ramirez-Ruiz, E. and Ishwara-Chandra, C. H. and Oosterloo, T. A. and Garrett, M. A. and Wiersema, K. and Starling, R. L. C. and Bhattacharya, D. and Curran, P. A., E-mail: Alexander.J.VanDerHorst@nasa.gov},
abstractNote = {The galaxy NGC 2770 hosted two core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions, SN 2008D and SN 2007uy, within 10 days of each other and 9 years after the first SN of the same type, SN 1999eh, was found in that galaxy. In particular, SN 2008D attracted a lot of attention due to the detection of an X-ray outburst, which has been hypothesized to be caused by either a (mildly) relativistic jet or the SN shock breakout. We present an extensive study of the radio emission from SN 2008D and SN 2007uy: flux measurements with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, covering {approx}600 days with observing frequencies ranging from 325 MHz to 8.4 GHz. The results of two epochs of global Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations are also discussed. We have examined the molecular gas in the host galaxy NGC 2770 with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope, and present the implications of our observations for the star formation and seemingly high SN rate in this galaxy. Furthermore, we discuss the near-future observing possibilities of the two SNe and their host galaxy at low radio frequencies with the Low Frequency Array.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/726/2/99},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 726,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2011},
month = {Mon Jan 10 00:00:00 EST 2011}
}
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