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Title: PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES

Abstract

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagatingmore » waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)
  2. Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21562516
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 736; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/2041-8205/736/2/L24; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-8205
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ALFVEN WAVES; CHROMOSPHERE; SOLAR PROMINENCES; SOLAR WIND; STANDING WAVES; WAVE PROPAGATION; ATMOSPHERES; HYDROMAGNETIC WAVES; SOLAR ACTIVITY; SOLAR ATMOSPHERE; STELLAR ACTIVITY; STELLAR ATMOSPHERES; STELLAR WINDS

Citation Formats

Okamoto, Takenori J., and De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp. PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/2/L24.
Okamoto, Takenori J., & De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp. PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES. United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/2/L24.
Okamoto, Takenori J., and De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp. Mon . "PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES". United States. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/736/2/L24.
@article{osti_21562516,
title = {PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES},
author = {Okamoto, Takenori J. and De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp},
abstractNote = {Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.},
doi = {10.1088/2041-8205/736/2/L24},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
issn = {2041-8205},
number = 2,
volume = 736,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {8}
}