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Title: TWO EFFICIENT, NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING DISPERSED RADIO PULSES WITH INTERFEROMETERS: THE CHIRPOLATOR AND THE CHIMAGEATOR

Abstract

Searching for dispersed radio pulses in interferometric data is of great scientific interest, but poses a formidable computational burden. Here, we present two efficient, new antenna-coherent solutions: The Chirpolator and The Chimageator. We describe the equations governing both techniques and propose a number of novel optimizations. We compare the implementation costs of our techniques with classical methods using three criteria: the operation rates (1) before and (2) after the integrate-and-dump stage, and (3) the data rate directly after the integrate-and-dump stage. When compared with classical methods, our techniques excel in the regime of sparse arrays, where they both require substantially lower data rates, and The Chirpolator requires a much lower post-integrator operation rate. In general, our techniques require more pre-integrator operations than the classical ones. We argue that the data and operation rates required by our techniques are better matched to future supercomputer architectures, where the arithmetic capability is outstripping the bandwidth capability. Our techniques are, therefore, viable candidates for deploying on future interferometers such as the Square Kilometer Array.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)
  2. CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21560327
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 196; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0067-0049/196/2/16; Journal ID: ISSN 0067-0049
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; INTERFEROMETERS; PULSARS; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RADIATIONS

Citation Formats

Bannister, K. W., and Cornwell, T. J., E-mail: k.bannister@physics.usyd.edu.au. TWO EFFICIENT, NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING DISPERSED RADIO PULSES WITH INTERFEROMETERS: THE CHIRPOLATOR AND THE CHIMAGEATOR. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/196/2/16.
Bannister, K. W., & Cornwell, T. J., E-mail: k.bannister@physics.usyd.edu.au. TWO EFFICIENT, NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING DISPERSED RADIO PULSES WITH INTERFEROMETERS: THE CHIRPOLATOR AND THE CHIMAGEATOR. United States. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/196/2/16.
Bannister, K. W., and Cornwell, T. J., E-mail: k.bannister@physics.usyd.edu.au. Sat . "TWO EFFICIENT, NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING DISPERSED RADIO PULSES WITH INTERFEROMETERS: THE CHIRPOLATOR AND THE CHIMAGEATOR". United States. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/196/2/16.
@article{osti_21560327,
title = {TWO EFFICIENT, NEW TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING DISPERSED RADIO PULSES WITH INTERFEROMETERS: THE CHIRPOLATOR AND THE CHIMAGEATOR},
author = {Bannister, K. W. and Cornwell, T. J., E-mail: k.bannister@physics.usyd.edu.au},
abstractNote = {Searching for dispersed radio pulses in interferometric data is of great scientific interest, but poses a formidable computational burden. Here, we present two efficient, new antenna-coherent solutions: The Chirpolator and The Chimageator. We describe the equations governing both techniques and propose a number of novel optimizations. We compare the implementation costs of our techniques with classical methods using three criteria: the operation rates (1) before and (2) after the integrate-and-dump stage, and (3) the data rate directly after the integrate-and-dump stage. When compared with classical methods, our techniques excel in the regime of sparse arrays, where they both require substantially lower data rates, and The Chirpolator requires a much lower post-integrator operation rate. In general, our techniques require more pre-integrator operations than the classical ones. We argue that the data and operation rates required by our techniques are better matched to future supercomputer architectures, where the arithmetic capability is outstripping the bandwidth capability. Our techniques are, therefore, viable candidates for deploying on future interferometers such as the Square Kilometer Array.},
doi = {10.1088/0067-0049/196/2/16},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series},
issn = {0067-0049},
number = 2,
volume = 196,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {10}
}