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Title: Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows

Abstract

A nonlinear numerical model has been developed to assess nonequilibrium effects in cavitating flows. The numerical implementation involves a two-phase treatment with the use of a pseudo-density which varies between the liquid and gas/vapor extremes. A new constitutive equation for the pseudo-density is derived based on the bubble response described by a modified form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Use of this constitutive equation in a numerical procedure permits the assessment of nonequilibrium effects. This scheme provides a quantitative description of scaling effects in cavitated flows. With minimal modifications, the model can also be used for bubbly two-phase flows.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
215430
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Fluids Engineering; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; WATER PUMPS; CAVITATION; FLUID MECHANICS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; HYDRODYNAMICS

Citation Formats

Chen, Y., and Heister, S.D.. Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1115/1.2817497.
Chen, Y., & Heister, S.D.. Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows. United States. doi:10.1115/1.2817497.
Chen, Y., and Heister, S.D.. 1996. "Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows". United States. doi:10.1115/1.2817497.
@article{osti_215430,
title = {Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows},
author = {Chen, Y. and Heister, S.D.},
abstractNote = {A nonlinear numerical model has been developed to assess nonequilibrium effects in cavitating flows. The numerical implementation involves a two-phase treatment with the use of a pseudo-density which varies between the liquid and gas/vapor extremes. A new constitutive equation for the pseudo-density is derived based on the bubble response described by a modified form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Use of this constitutive equation in a numerical procedure permits the assessment of nonequilibrium effects. This scheme provides a quantitative description of scaling effects in cavitated flows. With minimal modifications, the model can also be used for bubbly two-phase flows.},
doi = {10.1115/1.2817497},
journal = {Journal of Fluids Engineering},
number = 1,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 3
}
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