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Title: Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films

Abstract

In order to investigate the effect of the particular structure of latex films on mechanical (stress-strain behavior) and adhesion (measured by peeling) properties, this work compares these characteristics for latex films and corresponding {open_quotes}solution films{close_quotes}. Solution films were obtained by dissolving the latex film in an appropriate solvent and forming a new film by evaporating the solvent. Four different systems were studied. It was shown that latex films have Young`s moduli systematically much higher than the corresponding solution films. This is due to the fact that the hydrophilic shells of the latex particles form a continuous phase in the latex film which increases the modulus thanks to polar interactions. However, adhesion energy for latex films is always smaller than for solution films. This is interpreted in terms of structure of the film-support interface and dissipative processes within the bulk of the films.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Strasbourrg (France)
  2. PPG Franch, Saultain (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
215186
Report Number(s):
CONF-950801-
TRN: 96:000922-0712
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 210. national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Chicago, IL (United States), 20-25 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of 210th ACS national meeting. Part 1 and 2; PB: 1866 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; LATEX; ADHESION; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; YOUNG MODULUS; INTERFACES

Citation Formats

Charmeau, J.Y., Holl, Y., and Kientz, E.. Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Charmeau, J.Y., Holl, Y., & Kientz, E.. Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films. United States.
Charmeau, J.Y., Holl, Y., and Kientz, E.. 1995. "Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_215186,
title = {Effects on film structure on mechanical and adhesion properties of latex films},
author = {Charmeau, J.Y. and Holl, Y. and Kientz, E.},
abstractNote = {In order to investigate the effect of the particular structure of latex films on mechanical (stress-strain behavior) and adhesion (measured by peeling) properties, this work compares these characteristics for latex films and corresponding {open_quotes}solution films{close_quotes}. Solution films were obtained by dissolving the latex film in an appropriate solvent and forming a new film by evaporating the solvent. Four different systems were studied. It was shown that latex films have Young`s moduli systematically much higher than the corresponding solution films. This is due to the fact that the hydrophilic shells of the latex particles form a continuous phase in the latex film which increases the modulus thanks to polar interactions. However, adhesion energy for latex films is always smaller than for solution films. This is interpreted in terms of structure of the film-support interface and dissipative processes within the bulk of the films.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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