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Title: Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

Abstract

The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States)
  2. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21516805
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1344; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: ICAMDATA-2010: 7. international conference on atomic and molecular data and their applications, Vilnius (Lithuania), 21-24 Sep 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3585821; (c) 2011 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; ELECTRONS; EXCITATION; FLUORESCENCE; FLUORESCENT LAMPS; HOT ATOM CHEMISTRY; LIGHT SOURCES; MOLECULES; PHOSPHORS; POTENTIAL ENERGY; RARE EARTHS; VISIBLE SPECTRA; CHEMISTRY; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; ELEMENTS; EMISSION; ENERGY; ENERGY-LEVEL TRANSITIONS; FERMIONS; LEPTONS; LIGHT BULBS; LUMINESCENCE; METALS; PHOTON EMISSION; RADIATION SOURCES; RADIOCHEMISTRY; SPECTRA

Citation Formats

Lister, Graeme, and Curry, John J. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3585821.
Lister, Graeme, & Curry, John J. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3585821.
Lister, Graeme, and Curry, John J. 2011. "Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3585821.
@article{osti_21516805,
title = {Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules},
author = {Lister, Graeme and Curry, John J.},
abstractNote = {The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3585821},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1344,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 5
}
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