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Title: Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics

Abstract

Modern theories of everything, or theories of the grand unification of all physical interactions, try to describe the whole world starting from the first principles of quantum theory. However, the first principles operate with undetermined notions, such as the wave {psi}-function, particle, lepton and quark, de Broglie and Compton wavelengths, mass, electric charge, spin, electromagnetic field, photon, gravitation, physical vacuum, space, etc. From a logical point of view this means that such modern approach to the theory of everything is condemned to failure... Thus, what should we suggest to improve the situation? It seems quite reasonable to develop initially a theory of something, which will be able to clarify the major fundamental notions (listed above) that physics operates with every day. What would be a starting point in such approach? Of course a theory of space as such, because particles and all physical fields emerge just from space. After that, when a particle and fields (and hence the fields' carriers) are well defined and introduced in the well defined physical space, different kinds of interactions can be proposed and investigated. Moreover, we must also allow for a possible interaction of a created particle with the space that generated the appearancemore » of the particle. The mathematical studies of Michel Bounias and the author have shown what the real physical space is, how the space is constituted, how it is arranged and what its elements are. Having constructed the real physical space we can then derive whatever we wish, in particular, such basic notions as mass, particle and charge. How are mechanics of such objects (a massive particle, a charged massive particle) organised? The appropriate theory of motion has been called a sub microscopic mechanics of particles, which is developed in the real physical space, not an abstract phase space, as conventional quantum mechanics does. A series of questions arise: can these two mechanics (submicroscopic and conventional quantum mechanics) be unified?, what can such unification bring new for us?, can such submicroscopic mechanics be a starting point for the derivation of the phenomenon of gravity?, can this new theory be a unified physical theory?, does the theory allow experimental verification? These major points have been clarified in detail. And, perhaps, the most intriguing aspect of the theory is the derivation of a new physical field associated with the notion of mass (or rather inertia of a particle, which has been called the inerton field and which represents a real sense of the particle's wave {psi}-function). This field emerges by analogy with the electromagnetic field associated with the notion of the electric charge. Yes, the postulated inerton field has being tested in a series of different experiments. Even more, the inerton field might have a number of practical applications...« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Indra Scientific SA, Square du Solbosch 26, Brussels, B-1050 (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21510000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1316; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 7. Vigier symposium: International symposium honoring French mathematical physicist Jean-Pierre Vigier, London (United Kingdom), 12-14 Jul 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3536437; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COMPTON WAVELENGTH; ELECTRIC CHARGES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS; GRAND UNIFIED THEORY; GRAVITATION; INTERACTIONS; LEPTONS; MASS; MOMENT OF INERTIA; PARTICLES; PHASE SPACE; PHOTONS; POLARONS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; QUARKS; SPIN; VERIFICATION; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; BOSONS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FERMIONS; FIELD THEORIES; MASSLESS PARTICLES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MATHEMATICAL SPACE; MATHEMATICS; MECHANICS; PARTICLE MODELS; PARTICLE PROPERTIES; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; QUASI PARTICLES; SPACE; UNIFIED GAUGE MODELS

Citation Formats

Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr. Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3536437.
Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr. Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3536437.
Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr. Wed . "Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3536437.
@article{osti_21510000,
title = {Inerton fields: very new ideas on fundamental physics},
author = {Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr},
abstractNote = {Modern theories of everything, or theories of the grand unification of all physical interactions, try to describe the whole world starting from the first principles of quantum theory. However, the first principles operate with undetermined notions, such as the wave {psi}-function, particle, lepton and quark, de Broglie and Compton wavelengths, mass, electric charge, spin, electromagnetic field, photon, gravitation, physical vacuum, space, etc. From a logical point of view this means that such modern approach to the theory of everything is condemned to failure... Thus, what should we suggest to improve the situation? It seems quite reasonable to develop initially a theory of something, which will be able to clarify the major fundamental notions (listed above) that physics operates with every day. What would be a starting point in such approach? Of course a theory of space as such, because particles and all physical fields emerge just from space. After that, when a particle and fields (and hence the fields' carriers) are well defined and introduced in the well defined physical space, different kinds of interactions can be proposed and investigated. Moreover, we must also allow for a possible interaction of a created particle with the space that generated the appearance of the particle. The mathematical studies of Michel Bounias and the author have shown what the real physical space is, how the space is constituted, how it is arranged and what its elements are. Having constructed the real physical space we can then derive whatever we wish, in particular, such basic notions as mass, particle and charge. How are mechanics of such objects (a massive particle, a charged massive particle) organised? The appropriate theory of motion has been called a sub microscopic mechanics of particles, which is developed in the real physical space, not an abstract phase space, as conventional quantum mechanics does. A series of questions arise: can these two mechanics (submicroscopic and conventional quantum mechanics) be unified?, what can such unification bring new for us?, can such submicroscopic mechanics be a starting point for the derivation of the phenomenon of gravity?, can this new theory be a unified physical theory?, does the theory allow experimental verification? These major points have been clarified in detail. And, perhaps, the most intriguing aspect of the theory is the derivation of a new physical field associated with the notion of mass (or rather inertia of a particle, which has been called the inerton field and which represents a real sense of the particle's wave {psi}-function). This field emerges by analogy with the electromagnetic field associated with the notion of the electric charge. Yes, the postulated inerton field has being tested in a series of different experiments. Even more, the inerton field might have a number of practical applications...},
doi = {10.1063/1.3536437},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 1316,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {12}
}