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Title: Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale

Abstract

Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21499672
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2010.12.007; PII: S0195-9255(10)00154-X; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AUSTRALIA; COMMUNITIES; ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS; PUBLIC POLICY; SOCIAL IMPACT; AUSTRALASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; PUBLIC OPINION

Citation Formats

Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2010.12.007.
Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2010.12.007.
Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a. 2011. "Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2010.12.007.
@article{osti_21499672,
title = {Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale},
author = {Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: jacki.schirmer@anu.edu.a},
abstractNote = {Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2010.12.007},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 3,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 4
}
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