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Title: Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers

Abstract

We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21476382
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 107; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3311553; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FAILURES; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; LIGHT TRANSMISSION; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; RADICALS; RESINS; STRAINS; STRESS RELAXATION; STRESSES; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; CALCULATION METHODS; CHEMISTRY; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLYMERS; RADIATIONS; RELAXATION; TRANSMISSION

Citation Formats

Long, Kevin N., Dunn, Martin L., Scott, Timothy F., Turpin, Lucas P., and Qi, H. Jerry. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3311553.
Long, Kevin N., Dunn, Martin L., Scott, Timothy F., Turpin, Lucas P., & Qi, H. Jerry. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3311553.
Long, Kevin N., Dunn, Martin L., Scott, Timothy F., Turpin, Lucas P., and Qi, H. Jerry. Mon . "Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3311553.
@article{osti_21476382,
title = {Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers},
author = {Long, Kevin N. and Dunn, Martin L. and Scott, Timothy F. and Turpin, Lucas P. and Qi, H. Jerry},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3311553},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 107,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Mon Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}
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