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Title: Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

Abstract

Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. St George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21467392
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-007-9052-3; Copyright (c) 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; BYPASSES; ISCHEMIA; LIMBS; SURGERY; ANEMIAS; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; DISEASES; HEMIC DISEASES; MEDICINE; ORGANS; SYMPTOMS; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Raja, Jowad, Munneke, Graham, Morgan, Robert, and Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.u. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-007-9052-3.
Raja, Jowad, Munneke, Graham, Morgan, Robert, & Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.u. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-007-9052-3.
Raja, Jowad, Munneke, Graham, Morgan, Robert, and Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.u. 2008. "Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-007-9052-3.
@article{osti_21467392,
title = {Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions},
author = {Raja, Jowad and Munneke, Graham and Morgan, Robert and Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.u},
abstractNote = {Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-007-9052-3},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 7
}
  • PurposeThe purpose of this study is to accentuate the efficacy of direct stenting (stent placement without predilatation of the lesion) in patients with acute lower limb arterial ischemia (ALLI).Materials and MethodsBetween January 2010 and September 2015, 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) underwent direct stenting of acute arterial occlusions. All patients had contraindication for surgical revascularization or catheter-directed thrombolysis. According to SVS/ISCVS Classification, six patients had IIa and ten patients IIb ALLI. The occlusions were located in CIA, EIA, SFA, or popliteal artery. Mean follow-up time with clinical examination and color Duplex ultrasonography was 37.6 months (range 1–72). We analyzedmore » the technical and clinical outcomes of the procedures, as well the complications and patency rates.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all patients (16/16) and there was significant clinical improvement in 15 patients. There was neither distal embolization nor procedure-related complications. During the 6 years of follow-up, four patients died due to non-procedure-related causes and there were two minor and one major amputations. The primary patency rates and the amputation-free survival rates were 93.7 and 87% at 1 year, 75.2 and 71.2% at 3 years, and 75.2 and 62.3%, respectively, at 6 years.ConclusionsDirect stenting may be a valuable alternative procedure for acute arterial occlusions in selected cases with high technical success and significant clinical improvement.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, Case Series.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The purpose of this study was to describe alternative endovascular (EV) techniques and assess their feasibility and efficacy in minimizing failure rates in limb salvage for the treatment of complex below-the knee (BTK) occlusions that could not be crossed with a conventional antegrade access. Between December 2007 and November 2010, 1,035 patients (557 male) underwent EV treatment for critical limb ischemia in our institution. In 124 (12% [83 male], mean age 68.2 {+-} 0.5 years) patients, transfemoral antegrade revascularization attempt failed, and an alternative approach was used. Follow-up was performed at 1 and 6 months. Results were compared with 56more » patients treated between November 2002 and November 2007, in whom conventional technique was unsuccessful and unconventional techniques were not adopted. Technical success was achieved in 119 (96%) patients. The limb-salvage rates were 96.8% and 83% at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Sixteen (12.9%) and 33 (26.6%) patients underwent reintervention at 1- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Transcutaneous oxygen tension increased at 1 month (44.7 {+-} 1.1 vs. 15.7 {+-} 0.8 mmHg; p < 0.001) and remained stable at follow-up. Twenty (16.1%) patients required major amputation. Thirteen (10.4%) patients died during follow-up. In our previous experience, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty failure, amputation, and death rates were 10.9, 39.2, and 23.2%, respectively. Alternative techniques allowed a significant decrease of major amputation and death rates (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.02, respectively). The use of alternative techniques seems feasible in case of a failed antegrade BTK revascularization attempt and could minimize failure rates in the treatment of complex occlusions while providing satisfying clinical success rates at 6 months.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous arterial embolization in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma were treated with percutaneous arterial embolization between 2002 and 2007. All injuries were secondary to penetrating stab wounds. Active bleeding (eight patients), recurrent bleeding episodes (one patient), persistent pain and mass (one patient), leg edema, claudication, swelling (one patient), local hyperemia, and pain (one patient) were the presenting symptoms. Microcatheter systems were used for catheterization. We used n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture as the embolizing agent in all patients. Results:more » On angiograms the inferior gluteal artery (one patient), internal pudendal artery (one patient), perforating branch of the profundal femoral artery (six patients), superficial femoral artery (one patient), peroneal artery (two patients), and anterior tibial artery (one patient) were found to be injured. In all patients, the source of arterial bleeding could be reached, and a safe embolization was achieved. Nontarget embolization due to backflow of n-butyl cyanoacrylate mixture was detected in two patients and inguinal hematoma at the puncture site occurred in one patient. Conclusions: We conclude that embolization-particularly n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization-is technically feasible in patients with penetrating peripheral arterial trauma.« less
  • We report our experience with the use of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before limb salvage surgery in patients with osteosarcoma of the lower extremity. We evaluated the effect of this procedure on the degree of tumor necrosis and on the amount of blood loss during surgery. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who received intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before undergoing limb salvage surgery for osteosarcoma of the lower extremity at our institution between January 2003 and April 2008. Patient demographic, tumor characteristics, treatment details, postembolization complications, and surgical and pathological findings were recorded for each patient. We evaluatedmore » the operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), and volume of blood transfusion during surgery and in the postoperative period in all patients in the study group. The same parameters were recorded for 65 other patients with lower extremity osteosarcoma who underwent limb salvage operation at our institution without undergoing preoperative intervention. The study included 47 patients (25 males and 22 females). Angiography showed that the tumors were hypervascular. Intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization were performed successfully, resulting in a substantial reduction or complete disappearance of tumor stain in all patients. No major complications were encountered. At the time of surgery, performed 3-7 days after embolization, a fibrous edematous band around the tumor was observed in 43 of the 47 patients, facilitating surgery. The goal of limb salvage was achieved successfully in all cases. Percentage tumor necrosis induced by treatment ranged from 70.2% to 94.2% (average, 82.9%). EBL during surgery, EBL from drains in the postoperative period, total EBL, and transfusion volumes were significantly lower in the 47 study patients compared to the 65 patients who underwent surgery without preoperative treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization. The mean operative time was also significantly less in the intervention group compared to the nonintervention group (73.2 vs. 88.5 min; p < 0.05). In conclusion, intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization performed 3 to 7 days before limb salvage surgery in patients with lower extremity osteosarcomas can cause substantial tumor necrosis, reduce the EBL and transfusion requirements during surgery, and induce formation of a false capsule around the tumor, thus facilitating surgical excision of the tumors.« less