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Title: EVOLUTION OF THE AXIAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR FILAMENT CHANNELS

Abstract

Formation of solar filament channels by photospheric magnetic reconnection is considered. A magnetohydrodynamic model for magnetic merging, driven by converging convective motions in the photosphere, is presented. Evolution of the axial magnetic field in a channel is analyzed. An exact time-dependent analytical solution for the field profile in a steady stagnation-point flow is derived. The maximum magnetic field in the channel is determined, and its dependence on the reconnection inflow speed is discussed. The quantitative results show that the maximum axial magnetic field in a forming channel is an indicator of the photospheric reconnection rate, in agreement with recent solar observations and laboratory experiments.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P. B. 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21460096
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 720; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/720/1/948
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANALYTICAL SOLUTION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC RECONNECTION; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; PHOTOSPHERE; SOLAR SYSTEM EVOLUTION; STAGNATION POINT; SUN; TIME DEPENDENCE; TOPOLOGY; ATMOSPHERES; EVOLUTION; FLUID MECHANICS; HYDRODYNAMICS; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; MATHEMATICS; MECHANICS; SOLAR ATMOSPHERE; STARS; STELLAR ATMOSPHERES

Citation Formats

Litvinenko, Yuri E. EVOLUTION OF THE AXIAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR FILAMENT CHANNELS. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/720/1/948.
Litvinenko, Yuri E. EVOLUTION OF THE AXIAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR FILAMENT CHANNELS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/720/1/948.
Litvinenko, Yuri E. Wed . "EVOLUTION OF THE AXIAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR FILAMENT CHANNELS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/720/1/948.
@article{osti_21460096,
title = {EVOLUTION OF THE AXIAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR FILAMENT CHANNELS},
author = {Litvinenko, Yuri E.},
abstractNote = {Formation of solar filament channels by photospheric magnetic reconnection is considered. A magnetohydrodynamic model for magnetic merging, driven by converging convective motions in the photosphere, is presented. Evolution of the axial magnetic field in a channel is analyzed. An exact time-dependent analytical solution for the field profile in a steady stagnation-point flow is derived. The maximum magnetic field in the channel is determined, and its dependence on the reconnection inflow speed is discussed. The quantitative results show that the maximum axial magnetic field in a forming channel is an indicator of the photospheric reconnection rate, in agreement with recent solar observations and laboratory experiments.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/720/1/948},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 720,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}
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