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Title: Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84%more » {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. University of Liverpool, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy (United Kingdom)
  2. University Hospitals of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)
  3. University Hospitals of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21450361
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-008-9318-4; Copyright (c) 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; BIOLOGICAL REPAIR; GRAFTS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; ORGANS; REPAIR; TRANSPLANTS

Citation Formats

England, Andrew, E-mail: a.england@liv.ac.u, Butterfield, John S., McCollum, Charles N., and Ashleigh, Raymond J. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9318-4.
England, Andrew, E-mail: a.england@liv.ac.u, Butterfield, John S., McCollum, Charles N., & Ashleigh, Raymond J. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9318-4.
England, Andrew, E-mail: a.england@liv.ac.u, Butterfield, John S., McCollum, Charles N., and Ashleigh, Raymond J. 2008. "Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9318-4.
@article{osti_21450361,
title = {Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries},
author = {England, Andrew, E-mail: a.england@liv.ac.u and Butterfield, John S. and McCollum, Charles N. and Ashleigh, Raymond J.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84% {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-008-9318-4},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 4,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 7
}
  • Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 ofmore » these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.« less
  • In this prospective study we examined whether dilated common iliac arteries (CIAs) can provide a safe distal seal in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the use of bifurcated stent grafts with large diameter limbs. Sixteen patients with 26 dilated CIAs with a diameter of {>=}6 mm who were offered EVAR using stent grafts with large diameter limbs were included in the study (Group A). Forty-two patients who also underwent EVAR without iliac dilatation, matched for age, sex and surgical risk were used for comparison (controls-Group B). In group A mean CIA diameter was 18.2 mm (16-28) and mean abdominal aorticmore » aneurysm (AAA) diameter was 6.87 {+-} 1.05 cm; mean age was 77.2 {+-} 4.8 yrs (67-81). Mean follow-up was 33.6 months (2.8 yrs). CIA diameter changes and development of endoleaks were assessed by CT angiography (CTA). Overall iliac dilatation was present in 16/58 of our patients (27.6%). In 10 patients dilatation was bilateral (17.3%). Partial or complete flow to the internal iliac artery (IIA) territories was preserved in all patients post-EVAR. On follow-up, stable caliber of the dilated CIAs was observed in 21 patients (84%), enlargement of 1mm in 3 (16%), and failure of the distal attachment in 1 (6.2%). Compared to the control group there was no statistical significance in the incidence of complications. Dilated common iliac arteries provide a safe distal seal in patients who have undergone EVAR, thus obviating the need for additional endovascular procedures and sparing flow in the IIA vascular bed.« less
  • Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adversemore » features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a bifurcated stent-graft with a wide iliac limb end (WILE) in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with a dilated common iliac artery (CIA) to avoid occlusion of the internaliliac artery (IIA). The WILE, covered with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft which was constructed of large diameter stents according to the individual CIA diameter, was connected to a two-piece bifurcated stent-graft covering a polyester graft. The WILE was placed in eight dilated CIAs of six patients. All but one WILE fitted the dilated CIA well. One did not fit,more » and coil embolization of the leak was needed. All eight IIA derived from the dilated CIA avoided occlusion. Perigraft leak due to other causes was identified in another two patients. Limb kinking was observed in two patients. Our stent is useful in the treatment of AAA with dilated CIA to avoid occlusion of the IIA, and may extend the indication of endoluminal repair of AAA.« less
  • We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a late type 1b endoleak due to proximal migration of both iliac limbs 5 years after endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The endovascular method used to correct bilaterally this condition is described. Final angiographic control shows patency of the stent-graft without signs of endoleak.