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Title: Operating range of a differential-absorption lidar based on a CO{sub 2} laser

Abstract

The echolocation range and the remote sensing of ethylene in the atmosphere are simulated for a differential-absorption lidar based on TEA CO{sub 2} lasers. The dependence of the lidar echolocation range on the energy and the peak power of probe pulses is shown to be close to logarithmic. It is demonstrated that the use of narrow-band spectral filters is justified only for low-noise detectors and viewing angles of the receiver exceeding 5 mrad. The relative measurement error of the ethylene concentration in the atmosphere is estimated for various detection modes. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21442746
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.); Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1070/QE2000v030n08ABEH001804
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION; ATMOSPHERES; CARBON DIOXIDE LASERS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; ETHYLENE; FILTERS; OPTICAL RADAR; PEAK LOAD; PULSES; REMOTE SENSING; ALKENES; DIMENSIONLESS NUMBERS; GAS LASERS; HYDROCARBONS; LASERS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RADAR; RANGE FINDERS; SORPTION

Citation Formats

Ivashchenko, M V, and Sherstov, I V. Operating range of a differential-absorption lidar based on a CO{sub 2} laser. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1070/QE2000V030N08ABEH001804.
Ivashchenko, M V, & Sherstov, I V. Operating range of a differential-absorption lidar based on a CO{sub 2} laser. United States. doi:10.1070/QE2000V030N08ABEH001804.
Ivashchenko, M V, and Sherstov, I V. 2000. "Operating range of a differential-absorption lidar based on a CO{sub 2} laser". United States. doi:10.1070/QE2000V030N08ABEH001804.
@article{osti_21442746,
title = {Operating range of a differential-absorption lidar based on a CO{sub 2} laser},
author = {Ivashchenko, M V and Sherstov, I V},
abstractNote = {The echolocation range and the remote sensing of ethylene in the atmosphere are simulated for a differential-absorption lidar based on TEA CO{sub 2} lasers. The dependence of the lidar echolocation range on the energy and the peak power of probe pulses is shown to be close to logarithmic. It is demonstrated that the use of narrow-band spectral filters is justified only for low-noise detectors and viewing angles of the receiver exceeding 5 mrad. The relative measurement error of the ethylene concentration in the atmosphere is estimated for various detection modes. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)},
doi = {10.1070/QE2000V030N08ABEH001804},
journal = {Quantum Electronics (Woodbury, N.Y.)},
number = 8,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month = 8
}
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