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Title: Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?

Abstract

Purpose: For patients with an extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative radiotherapy and surgically excised with positive margins, we retrospectively reviewed whether a postoperative radiation boost reduced the risk of local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with positive margins after resection of an extremity STS treated between 1986 and 2003 were identified from our institution's prospectively collected database. Patient demographics, radiation therapy parameters including timing and dose, classification of positive margin status, reasons for not administering a postoperative boost, and oncologic outcome were collected and evaluated. Results: Of the 216 patients with a positive surgical margin, 52 patients were treated with preoperative radiation therapy alone (50 Gy), whereas 41 received preoperative radiation therapy plus a postoperative boost (80% received 16 Gy postoperatively for a total of 66 Gy). There was no difference in baseline tumor characteristics between the two groups. Six of 52 patients in the group receiving preoperative radiation alone developed a LR compared with 9 of 41 in the boost group. Five-year estimated LR-free survivals were 90.4% and 73.8%, respectively (p = 0.13). Conclusions: We found that including the postoperative radiation boost after preoperative radiation and a margin-positive excision did notmore » provide an advantage in preventing LR for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Given that higher radiation doses placed patients at greater risk for late complications such as fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness, judicious avoidance of the postoperative boost while maintaining an equivalent rate of local control can reduce the risk of these difficult-to-treat morbidities.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  2. Orthopaedic Surgery, University Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21436092
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.06.074; PII: S0360-3016(09)02771-0; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; EDEMA; FIBROSIS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SARCOMAS; SURGERY; DISEASES; DOSES; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; RADIOLOGY; SYMPTOMS; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Al Yami, Ali, Griffin, Anthony M., Ferguson, Peter C., Catton, Charles N., and Chung, Peter W.M.. Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.06.074.
Al Yami, Ali, Griffin, Anthony M., Ferguson, Peter C., Catton, Charles N., & Chung, Peter W.M.. Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.06.074.
Al Yami, Ali, Griffin, Anthony M., Ferguson, Peter C., Catton, Charles N., and Chung, Peter W.M.. 2010. "Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.06.074.
@article{osti_21436092,
title = {Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?},
author = {Al Yami, Ali and Griffin, Anthony M. and Ferguson, Peter C. and Catton, Charles N. and Chung, Peter W.M.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: For patients with an extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative radiotherapy and surgically excised with positive margins, we retrospectively reviewed whether a postoperative radiation boost reduced the risk of local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with positive margins after resection of an extremity STS treated between 1986 and 2003 were identified from our institution's prospectively collected database. Patient demographics, radiation therapy parameters including timing and dose, classification of positive margin status, reasons for not administering a postoperative boost, and oncologic outcome were collected and evaluated. Results: Of the 216 patients with a positive surgical margin, 52 patients were treated with preoperative radiation therapy alone (50 Gy), whereas 41 received preoperative radiation therapy plus a postoperative boost (80% received 16 Gy postoperatively for a total of 66 Gy). There was no difference in baseline tumor characteristics between the two groups. Six of 52 patients in the group receiving preoperative radiation alone developed a LR compared with 9 of 41 in the boost group. Five-year estimated LR-free survivals were 90.4% and 73.8%, respectively (p = 0.13). Conclusions: We found that including the postoperative radiation boost after preoperative radiation and a margin-positive excision did not provide an advantage in preventing LR for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Given that higher radiation doses placed patients at greater risk for late complications such as fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness, judicious avoidance of the postoperative boost while maintaining an equivalent rate of local control can reduce the risk of these difficult-to-treat morbidities.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2009.06.074},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: Surgery combined with radiation therapy (RT) is the cornerstone of multidisciplinary management of extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Although RT can be given in either the preoperative or the postoperative setting with similar local recurrence and survival outcomes, the side effect profiles, costs, and long-term functional outcomes are different. The aim of this study was to use decision analysis to determine optimal sequencing of RT with surgery in patients with extremity STS. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a state transition Markov model, with quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) as the primary outcome. A time horizon ofmore » 5 years, a cycle length of 3 months, and a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY was used. One-way deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the thresholds at which each strategy would be preferred. The robustness of the model was assessed by probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: Preoperative RT is a more cost-effective strategy ($26,633/3.00 QALYs) than postoperative RT ($28,028/2.86 QALYs) in our base case scenario. Preoperative RT is the superior strategy with either 3-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT. One-way sensitivity analyses identified the relative risk of chronic adverse events as having the greatest influence on the preferred timing of RT. The likelihood of preoperative RT being the preferred strategy was 82% on probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: Preoperative RT is more cost effective than postoperative RT in the management of resectable extremity STS, primarily because of the higher incidence of chronic adverse events with RT in the postoperative setting.« less
  • Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a totalmore » of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.« less
  • Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) hadmore » a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the surgical bed.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate inter- and intrafractional motion and rotational error for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma patients by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and an optical localization system. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one immobilized patients received CBCT image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Setup deviations of >3 mm from the planned isocenter were corrected. A second CBCT acquired before treatment delivery was registered to the planning CT to estimate interfractional setup error retrospectively. Interfractional error and rotational error were calculated in the left-right (LR), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions. Intrafractional motion was assessed by calculating the maximum relative displacement of opticalmore » localization system reflective markers placed on the patient's surface, combined with pre- and postfraction CBCT performed for 17 of the 31 patients once per week. The overall systematic error (SE) and random error (RE) were calculated for the interfractional and intrafractional motion for planning target volume margin calculation. Results: The standard deviation (SD) of the interfractional RE was 1.9 mm LR, 2.1 mm SI, and 1.8 mm AP, and the SE SD was 0.6 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.7 mm in each dimension, respectively. The overall rotation (inter- and intrafractional) had an RE SD of 0.8{sup o} LR, 1.7{sup o} SI, and 0.7{sup o} AP and an SE SD of 1.1{sup o} LR, 1.3{sup o} SI, and 0.3{sup o} AP. The SD of the overall intrafractional RE was 1.6 mm LR, 1.6 mm SI, and 1.4 mm AP, and the SE SD was 0.7 mm AP, 0.6 mm SI, and 0.6 mm AP. Conclusions: A uniform 5-mm planning target volume margin was quantified for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma patients and has been implemented clinically for image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportionalmore » hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.« less