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Title: Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting

Abstract

To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Imperial College Healthcare, St Mary's Hospital, Regional Vascular Unit (United Kingdom)
  2. Hansen Medical (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21428552
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s00270-008-9459-5; Copyright (c) 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Article Copyright (c) 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AORTA; GRAFTS; KIDNEYS; ROBOTS; SWINE; TUBES; ANIMALS; ARTERIES; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; EQUIPMENT; MAMMALS; ORGANS; TRANSPLANTS; VERTEBRATES

Citation Formats

Riga, Celia V., E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.uk, Bicknell, Colin D., Wallace, Daniel, Hamady, Mohamad, and Cheshire, Nicholas. Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9459-5.
Riga, Celia V., E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.uk, Bicknell, Colin D., Wallace, Daniel, Hamady, Mohamad, & Cheshire, Nicholas. Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9459-5.
Riga, Celia V., E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.uk, Bicknell, Colin D., Wallace, Daniel, Hamady, Mohamad, and Cheshire, Nicholas. Fri . "Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-008-9459-5.
@article{osti_21428552,
title = {Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting},
author = {Riga, Celia V., E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.uk and Bicknell, Colin D. and Wallace, Daniel and Hamady, Mohamad and Cheshire, Nicholas},
abstractNote = {To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-008-9459-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Fri May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}
  • The purpose of this study was to present a technique of stereoscopic visualization in the evaluation of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with fenestrated stent grafts compared with conventional 2D visualizations. Two patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm undergoing fenestrated stent grafting were selected for inclusion in the study. Conventional 2D views including axial, multiplanar reformation, maximum-intensity projection, and volume rendering and 3D stereoscopic visualizations were assessed by two experienced reviewers independently with regard to the treatment outcomes of fenestrated repair. Interobserver agreement was assessed with Kendall's W statistic. Multiplanar reformation and maximum-intensity projection visualizations were scored the highest inmore » the evaluation of parameters related to the fenestrated stent grafting, while 3D stereoscopic visualization was scored as valuable in the evaluation of appearance (any distortions) of the fenestrated stent. Volume rendering was found to play a limited role in the follow-up of fenestrated stent grafting. 3D stereoscopic visualization adds additional information that assists endovascular specialists to identify any distortions of the fenestrated stents when compared with 2D visualizations.« less
  • Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach intomore » 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.« less
  • Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technicalmore » success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients.« less
  • We report the case of a patient who developed an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm in the left external iliac artery after transplant nephrectomy. The pseudoaneurysm most probably arose as a suture aneurysm from the external iliac artery after removal of the graft renal artery. Obviously we can not exclude the possibility it was a true aneurysm, although this seems much less likely. The pseudoaneurysm was detected during a routine CT scan and was treated interventionally with a stent-graft. One month later the asymptomatic patient underwent a vascular ultrasound examination including color Doppler, power Doppler, and B-flow as a routine control. An endoleakmore » with collapse of the stent-graft was diagnosed. There was no evidence of stent infection. At a reintervention, the pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated using two uncovered Palmaz stents at the proximal and distal edge of the stent graft. Peri- and post-interventional ultrasound and CT angiography confirmed the exclusion of the aneurysm without an endoleak.« less
  • PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrademore » puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.« less