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Title: Bell, group and tangle

Abstract

The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21426751
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Atomic Nuclei; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1134/S1063778810030166; Copyright (c) 2010 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; GROUP THEORY; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; TOPOLOGY; MATHEMATICS

Citation Formats

Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u. Bell, group and tangle. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063778810030166.
Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u. Bell, group and tangle. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063778810030166.
Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u. 2010. "Bell, group and tangle". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063778810030166.
@article{osti_21426751,
title = {Bell, group and tangle},
author = {Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u},
abstractNote = {The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063778810030166},
journal = {Physics of Atomic Nuclei},
number = 3,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 3
}
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