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Title: Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste

Abstract

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant releasemore » of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21418133
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2010.07.004; PII: S0956-053X(10)00344-2; Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; CARBON DIOXIDE; COMPOSTING; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; GREENHOUSE GASES; HOUSEHOLDS; METHANE; NITROUS OXIDE; ORGANIC WASTES; ALKANES; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; HYDROCARBONS; MANAGEMENT; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES

Citation Formats

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d, Boldrin, A., Christensen, T.H., and Scheutz, C. Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2010.07.004.
Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d, Boldrin, A., Christensen, T.H., & Scheutz, C. Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2010.07.004.
Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d, Boldrin, A., Christensen, T.H., and Scheutz, C. Wed . "Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2010.07.004.
@article{osti_21418133,
title = {Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste},
author = {Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d and Boldrin, A. and Christensen, T.H. and Scheutz, C.},
abstractNote = {The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wasman.2010.07.004},
journal = {Waste Management},
number = 12,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Wed Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}