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Title: Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch

Abstract

The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Guy's Hospital, Department of Radiology, 2nd Floor, Guy's Tower (United Kingdom)
  2. Guy's Hospital, Department of Surgery, 2nd Floor New Guy's House (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21414356
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1007/s002700010053; Copyright (c) 2000 Springer-Verlag
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AORTA; GRAFTS; PROSTHESES; TUBES; ARTERIES; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; MEDICAL SUPPLIES; ORGANS; TRANSPLANTS

Citation Formats

Shammari, Muhammad Al, Taylor, Peter, and Reidy, John F. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1007/S002700010053.
Shammari, Muhammad Al, Taylor, Peter, & Reidy, John F. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch. United States. doi:10.1007/S002700010053.
Shammari, Muhammad Al, Taylor, Peter, and Reidy, John F. 2000. "Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch". United States. doi:10.1007/S002700010053.
@article{osti_21414356,
title = {Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch},
author = {Shammari, Muhammad Al and Taylor, Peter and Reidy, John F.},
abstractNote = {The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.},
doi = {10.1007/S002700010053},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month = 5
}
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