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Title: Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

Abstract

A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21410342
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1234; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SRI 2009: 10. international conference on radiation instrumentation, Melbourne (Australia), 27 Sep - 2 Oct 2009; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3463337; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CONVERSION; FABRICATION; IMAGES; LUMINESCENCE; MONOCRYSTALS; OPTICS; PHOSPHORS; PLATES; QUANTUM EFFICIENCY; SENSITIVITY; SOFT X RADIATION; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; THIN FILMS; TWO-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; WAVELENGTHS; CRYSTALS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; EMISSION; FILMS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; PHOTON EMISSION; RADIATIONS; RESOLUTION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Ejima, Takeo, Ogasawara, Shodo, Hatano, Tadashi, Yanagihara, Mihiro, and Yamamoto, Masaki. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3463337.
Ejima, Takeo, Ogasawara, Shodo, Hatano, Tadashi, Yanagihara, Mihiro, & Yamamoto, Masaki. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3463337.
Ejima, Takeo, Ogasawara, Shodo, Hatano, Tadashi, Yanagihara, Mihiro, and Yamamoto, Masaki. 2010. "Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3463337.
@article{osti_21410342,
title = {Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging},
author = {Ejima, Takeo and Ogasawara, Shodo and Hatano, Tadashi and Yanagihara, Mihiro and Yamamoto, Masaki},
abstractNote = {A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3463337},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1234,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 6
}
  • No abstract prepared.
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