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Title: Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study

Abstract

The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes weremore » more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
  2. Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita ''Federico II'' di Napoli, Naples (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21396162
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Combustion and Flame; Journal Volume: 158; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ETHYLENE; BENZENE; AIR; SOOT; FLAMES; DISTRIBUTION; ABUNDANCE; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; NUCLEATION; TIME DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 1000-4000 K; SIMULATION; PARTICLE SIZE; AGGLOMERATION; FUELS; OXIDATION; PRECURSOR; ZONES; Soot size distribution; Particle nucleation; Agglomeration modeling

Citation Formats

Echavarria, Carlos A., Sarofim, Adel F., Lighty, JoAnn S., and D'Anna, Andrea. Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/J.COMBUSTFLAME.2010.07.021.
Echavarria, Carlos A., Sarofim, Adel F., Lighty, JoAnn S., & D'Anna, Andrea. Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study. United States. doi:10.1016/J.COMBUSTFLAME.2010.07.021.
Echavarria, Carlos A., Sarofim, Adel F., Lighty, JoAnn S., and D'Anna, Andrea. 2011. "Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study". United States. doi:10.1016/J.COMBUSTFLAME.2010.07.021.
@article{osti_21396162,
title = {Evolution of soot size distribution in premixed ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flames: Experimental and modeling study},
author = {Echavarria, Carlos A. and Sarofim, Adel F. and Lighty, JoAnn S. and D'Anna, Andrea},
abstractNote = {The effect of benzene concentration in the initial fuel on the evolution of soot size distribution in ethylene/air and ethylene/benzene/air flat flames was characterized by experimental measurements and model predictions of size and number concentration within the flames. Experimentally, a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to allow spatially resolved and online measurements of particle concentration and sizes in the nanometer-size range. The model couples a detailed kinetic scheme with a discrete-sectional approach to follow the transition from gas-phase to nascent particles and their coagulation to larger soot particles. The evolution of soot size distribution (experimental and modeled) in pure ethylene and ethylene flames doped with benzene showed a typical nucleation-sized (since particles do not actually nucleate in the classical sense particle inception is often used in place of nucleation) mode close to the burner surface, and a bimodal behavior at greater height above burner (HAB). However, major features were distinguished between the data sets. The growth of nucleation and agglomeration-sized particles was faster for ethylene/benzene/air flames, evidenced by the earlier presence of bimodality in these flames. The most significant changes in size distribution were attributed to an increase in benzene concentration in the initial fuel. However, these changes were more evident for high temperature flames. In agreement with the experimental data, the model also predicted the decrease of nucleation-sized particles in the postflame region for ethylene flames doped with benzene. This behavior was associated with the decrease of soot precursors after the main oxidation zone of the flames. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.COMBUSTFLAME.2010.07.021},
journal = {Combustion and Flame},
number = 1,
volume = 158,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 1
}
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