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Title: Diffraction imaging of crystals with focused x-ray beams

Abstract

We describe an imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam in crystals. A focused beam is formed by a zone plate and Bragg diffracted from a crystalline sample positioned between the zone plate and the focus. The intensity pattern is recorded by a high-resolution charge-coupled-device detector placed in the focus. Diffraction images recorded from perfect Si and GaAs crystals for various reflections demonstrate the broadening of the focused beam due to a finite scattering length. The images from semiconductor epitaxial films and heterostructures show additional peaks originating from the interfaces with their spatial position corresponding to the depth from the surface. Diffraction images from isolated defects in Si crystal demonstrate capabilities to study bulk defects. Theoretical simulations for perfect crystals show excellent agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the new imaging technique is depth sensitive and combines structural sensitivity of traditional x-ray topography methods with spatial in-plane resolution provided by focusing.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. CHESS, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)
  2. Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)
  3. Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21386734
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 21; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.214112; (c) 2010 The American Physical Society; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTALS; DIFFRACTION; EPITAXY; FILMS; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; IMAGES; INTERFACES; PEAKS; PLATES; REFLECTION; RESOLUTION; SCATTERING LENGTHS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SENSITIVITY; SILICON; SIMULATION; SURFACES; X RADIATION; ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ARSENIDES; COHERENT SCATTERING; CRYSTAL GROWTH METHODS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DIMENSIONS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; GALLIUM COMPOUNDS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; LENGTH; MATERIALS; PNICTIDES; RADIATIONS; SCATTERING; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; SEMIMETALS

Citation Formats

Kazimirov, A, Kohn, V G, and Cai, Z -H. Diffraction imaging of crystals with focused x-ray beams. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.81.214112.
Kazimirov, A, Kohn, V G, & Cai, Z -H. Diffraction imaging of crystals with focused x-ray beams. United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PHYSREVB.81.214112
Kazimirov, A, Kohn, V G, and Cai, Z -H. Tue . "Diffraction imaging of crystals with focused x-ray beams". United States. https://doi.org/10.1103/PHYSREVB.81.214112.
@article{osti_21386734,
title = {Diffraction imaging of crystals with focused x-ray beams},
author = {Kazimirov, A and Kohn, V G and Cai, Z -H},
abstractNote = {We describe an imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam in crystals. A focused beam is formed by a zone plate and Bragg diffracted from a crystalline sample positioned between the zone plate and the focus. The intensity pattern is recorded by a high-resolution charge-coupled-device detector placed in the focus. Diffraction images recorded from perfect Si and GaAs crystals for various reflections demonstrate the broadening of the focused beam due to a finite scattering length. The images from semiconductor epitaxial films and heterostructures show additional peaks originating from the interfaces with their spatial position corresponding to the depth from the surface. Diffraction images from isolated defects in Si crystal demonstrate capabilities to study bulk defects. Theoretical simulations for perfect crystals show excellent agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the new imaging technique is depth sensitive and combines structural sensitivity of traditional x-ray topography methods with spatial in-plane resolution provided by focusing.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.81.214112},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21386734}, journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
issn = {1098-0121},
number = 21,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {6}
}