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Title: RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

Abstract

Sixteen pulsars have been discovered so far in blind searches of photons collected with the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We here report the discovery of radio pulsations from two of them. PSR J1741-2054, with period P = 413 ms, was detected in archival Parkes telescope data and subsequently has been detected at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Its received flux varies greatly due to interstellar scintillation and it has a very small dispersion measure of DM = 4.7 pc cm{sup -3}, implying a distance of approx0.4 kpc and possibly the smallest luminosity of any known radio pulsar. At this distance, for isotropic emission, its gamma-ray luminosity above 0.1 GeV corresponds to 28% of the spin-down luminosity of E-dot=9.4x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The gamma-ray profile occupies 1/3 of pulse phase and has three closely spaced peaks with the first peak lagging the radio pulse by delta = 0.29 P. We have also identified a soft Swift source that is the likely X-ray counterpart. In many respects PSR J1741-2054 resembles the Geminga pulsar. The second source, PSR J2032+4127, was detected at the GBT. It has P = 143 ms, and its DM = 115 pc cm{supmore » -3} suggests a distance of approx3.6 kpc, but we consider it likely that it is located within the Cyg OB2 stellar association at half that distance. The radio emission is nearly 100% linearly polarized, and the main radio peak precedes by delta = 0.15 P the first of two narrow gamma-ray peaks that are separated by DELTA = 0.50 P. The second peak has a harder spectrum than the first one, following a trend observed in young gamma-ray pulsars. Faint, diffuse X-ray emission in a Chandra image is possibly its pulsar wind nebula. The wind of PSR J2032+4127 is responsible for the formerly unidentified HEGRA source TeV J2032+4130. PSR J2032+4127 is coincident in projection with MT91 213, a Be star in Cyg OB2, although apparently not a binary companion of it.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]; ; ;  [5];  [6]; ;  [7];  [8];  [9]; ; ;  [10];  [11]
  1. Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)
  2. Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)
  3. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)
  4. INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, 09012 Capoterra (Italy)
  5. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)
  6. Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)
  7. Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)
  8. Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)
  9. Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic 3122 (Australia)
  10. Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  11. CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, Gradignan, 33175 (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21378417
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 705; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/1; Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; EMISSION; GAMMA RADIATION; GEV RANGE; IMAGES; LUMINOSITY; NEBULAE; PHOTONS; PULSARS; PULSATIONS; PULSES; SCINTILLATIONS; STARS; TELESCOPES; TEV RANGE; X RADIATION; BOSONS; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; ENERGY RANGE; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MASSLESS PARTICLES; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; RADIATIONS

Citation Formats

Camilo, F, Gotthelf, E V, Halpern, J P, Ray, P S, Abdo, A A, Ransom, S M, Demorest, P, Burgay, M, Johnson, T J, Thompson, D J, Harding, A K, Kerr, M, Reynolds, J, Johnston, S, Romani, R W, Van Straten, W, Parkinson, P M. Saz, Ziegler, M, Dormody, M, and Smith, D A. RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/1.
Camilo, F, Gotthelf, E V, Halpern, J P, Ray, P S, Abdo, A A, Ransom, S M, Demorest, P, Burgay, M, Johnson, T J, Thompson, D J, Harding, A K, Kerr, M, Reynolds, J, Johnston, S, Romani, R W, Van Straten, W, Parkinson, P M. Saz, Ziegler, M, Dormody, M, & Smith, D A. RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/1.
Camilo, F, Gotthelf, E V, Halpern, J P, Ray, P S, Abdo, A A, Ransom, S M, Demorest, P, Burgay, M, Johnson, T J, Thompson, D J, Harding, A K, Kerr, M, Reynolds, J, Johnston, S, Romani, R W, Van Straten, W, Parkinson, P M. Saz, Ziegler, M, Dormody, M, and Smith, D A. Sun . "RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/1.
@article{osti_21378417,
title = {RADIO DETECTION OF LAT PSRs J1741-2054 AND J2032+4127: NO LONGER JUST GAMMA-RAY PULSARS},
author = {Camilo, F and Gotthelf, E V and Halpern, J P and Ray, P S and Abdo, A A and Ransom, S M and Demorest, P and Burgay, M and Johnson, T J and Thompson, D J and Harding, A K and Kerr, M and Reynolds, J and Johnston, S and Romani, R W and Van Straten, W and Parkinson, P M. Saz and Ziegler, M and Dormody, M and Smith, D A},
abstractNote = {Sixteen pulsars have been discovered so far in blind searches of photons collected with the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We here report the discovery of radio pulsations from two of them. PSR J1741-2054, with period P = 413 ms, was detected in archival Parkes telescope data and subsequently has been detected at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Its received flux varies greatly due to interstellar scintillation and it has a very small dispersion measure of DM = 4.7 pc cm{sup -3}, implying a distance of approx0.4 kpc and possibly the smallest luminosity of any known radio pulsar. At this distance, for isotropic emission, its gamma-ray luminosity above 0.1 GeV corresponds to 28% of the spin-down luminosity of E-dot=9.4x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The gamma-ray profile occupies 1/3 of pulse phase and has three closely spaced peaks with the first peak lagging the radio pulse by delta = 0.29 P. We have also identified a soft Swift source that is the likely X-ray counterpart. In many respects PSR J1741-2054 resembles the Geminga pulsar. The second source, PSR J2032+4127, was detected at the GBT. It has P = 143 ms, and its DM = 115 pc cm{sup -3} suggests a distance of approx3.6 kpc, but we consider it likely that it is located within the Cyg OB2 stellar association at half that distance. The radio emission is nearly 100% linearly polarized, and the main radio peak precedes by delta = 0.15 P the first of two narrow gamma-ray peaks that are separated by DELTA = 0.50 P. The second peak has a harder spectrum than the first one, following a trend observed in young gamma-ray pulsars. Faint, diffuse X-ray emission in a Chandra image is possibly its pulsar wind nebula. The wind of PSR J2032+4127 is responsible for the formerly unidentified HEGRA source TeV J2032+4130. PSR J2032+4127 is coincident in projection with MT91 213, a Be star in Cyg OB2, although apparently not a binary companion of it.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/1},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 1,
volume = 705,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {11}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Pulsed radio emission from the Fermi -LAT pulsar J1732−3131: search and a possible detection at 34.5 MHz : Periodic radio pulses from J1732−3131
journal, August 2012

  • Maan, Yogesh; Aswathappa, H. A.; Deshpande, Avinash A.
  • Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 425, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20608.x

Pulsar Searching and Timing
journal, January 2013


Pulsed radio emission from the Fermi -LAT pulsar J1732−3131: search and a possible detection at 34.5 MHz : Periodic radio pulses from J1732−3131
journal, August 2012

  • Maan, Yogesh; Aswathappa, H. A.; Deshpande, Avinash A.
  • Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 425, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20608.x

Pulsar Searching and Timing
journal, January 2013