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Title: Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

Abstract

Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. A.V.Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, 29, Leninskii Prospect, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21377983
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1255; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 5. international conference on times of polymers (TOP) and composites, Ischia (Italy), 20-23 Jun 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3455554; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ADHESION; ADHESIVES; CARBON FIBERS; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; CURING; EPOXIDES; FRACTURES; NANOSTRUCTURES; REINFORCED PLASTICS; RESINS; SURFACES; WETTABILITY; FAILURES; FIBERS; MATERIALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLASTICS; POLYMERS; REINFORCED MATERIALS; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Ilyin, S. O., Kotomin, S. V., and Kulichikhin, V. G.. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3455554.
Ilyin, S. O., Kotomin, S. V., & Kulichikhin, V. G.. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3455554.
Ilyin, S. O., Kotomin, S. V., and Kulichikhin, V. G.. Wed . "Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3455554.
@article{osti_21377983,
title = {Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers},
author = {Ilyin, S. O. and Kotomin, S. V. and Kulichikhin, V. G.},
abstractNote = {Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3455554},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1255,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2010},
month = {Wed Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2010}
}
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