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Title: An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly

Abstract

The Pulsar 1913+16 binary system may represent a 'young' binary system where previously it is claimed that the dynamics are due to either a third body or a gravitational vortex. Usually a binary system's trajectory could reside in a single ellipse or circular orbit; the double ellipse implies that the 1913+16 system may be starting to degenerate into a single elliptical trajectory. This could be validated only after a considerably long time period. In a majority of binary star systems, the weights of both stars are claimed by analysis to be the same. It may be feasible that the trajectory of the primary spinning star could demonstrate repulsive gravitational effects where the neutron star's high spin rate induces a repulsive gravitational source term that compensates for inertia. If true, then it provides evidence that angular momentum may be translated into linear momentum as a repulsive source that has propulsion implications. This also suggests mass differences may dictate the neutron star's spin rate as an artifact of a natural gravitational process. Moreover, the reduced matter required by the 'dark' mass hypothesis may not exist but these effects could be due to repulsive gravity residing in rotating celestial bodies.The Pioneer anomaly observedmore » on five different deep-space spacecraft, is the appearance of a constant gravitational force directed toward the sun. Pioneer spacecraft data reveals that a vortex-like magnetic field exists emanating from the sun. The spiral arms of the Sun's magnetic vortex field may be causal to this constant acceleration. This may profoundly provide a possible experimental verification on a cosmic scale of Gertsenshtein's principle relating gravity to electromagnetism. Furthermore, the anomalous acceleration may disappear once the spacecraft passes out into a magnetic spiral furrow, which is something that needs to be observed in the future. Other effects offer an explanation from space-time geometry to the Yarkovsky thermal effects are discussed.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Morningstar Applied Physics Inc., LLC, Vienna, VA 22182 (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21370940
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1208; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: SPESIF-2010: 14. conference on thermophysics applications in microgravity;7. symposium on new frontiers in space propulsion sciences;2. symposium on astrosociology;1. symposium on high frequency gravitational waves, Huntsville, AL (United States);Huntsville, AL (United States);Huntsville, AL (United States);Huntsville, AL (United States), 24-26 Feb 2009;24-26 Feb 2009;24-26 Feb 2009;24-26 Feb 2009; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3326256; (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; BINARY STARS; COSMOLOGY; ELECTROMAGNETISM; GEOMETRY; GRAVITATION; LINEAR MOMENTUM; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MASS DIFFERENCE; MOMENT OF INERTIA; NEUTRON STARS; ORBITS; PROPULSION; PULSARS; SPACE; SPACE-TIME; SPIN; SUN; TRAJECTORIES; VORTICES; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; MAGNETISM; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; MATHEMATICS; PARTICLE PROPERTIES; STARS

Citation Formats

Murad, Paul. An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3326256.
Murad, Paul. An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3326256.
Murad, Paul. Thu . "An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3326256.
@article{osti_21370940,
title = {An Anzatz about Gravity, Cosmology, and the Pioneer Anomaly},
author = {Murad, Paul},
abstractNote = {The Pulsar 1913+16 binary system may represent a 'young' binary system where previously it is claimed that the dynamics are due to either a third body or a gravitational vortex. Usually a binary system's trajectory could reside in a single ellipse or circular orbit; the double ellipse implies that the 1913+16 system may be starting to degenerate into a single elliptical trajectory. This could be validated only after a considerably long time period. In a majority of binary star systems, the weights of both stars are claimed by analysis to be the same. It may be feasible that the trajectory of the primary spinning star could demonstrate repulsive gravitational effects where the neutron star's high spin rate induces a repulsive gravitational source term that compensates for inertia. If true, then it provides evidence that angular momentum may be translated into linear momentum as a repulsive source that has propulsion implications. This also suggests mass differences may dictate the neutron star's spin rate as an artifact of a natural gravitational process. Moreover, the reduced matter required by the 'dark' mass hypothesis may not exist but these effects could be due to repulsive gravity residing in rotating celestial bodies.The Pioneer anomaly observed on five different deep-space spacecraft, is the appearance of a constant gravitational force directed toward the sun. Pioneer spacecraft data reveals that a vortex-like magnetic field exists emanating from the sun. The spiral arms of the Sun's magnetic vortex field may be causal to this constant acceleration. This may profoundly provide a possible experimental verification on a cosmic scale of Gertsenshtein's principle relating gravity to electromagnetism. Furthermore, the anomalous acceleration may disappear once the spacecraft passes out into a magnetic spiral furrow, which is something that needs to be observed in the future. Other effects offer an explanation from space-time geometry to the Yarkovsky thermal effects are discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3326256},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 1208,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {1}
}