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Title: BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission

Abstract

Background: In this study, it was determined that BKV is shed in saliva and an in vitro model system was developed whereby BKV can productively infect both submandibular (HSG) and parotid (HSY) salivary gland cell lines. Results: BKV was detected in oral fluids using quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR). BKV infection was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The infectivity of BKV was inhibited by pre-incubation of the virus with gangliosides that saturated the major capsid protein, VP1, halting receptor mediated BKV entry into salivary gland cells. Examination of infected cultures by transmission electron microscopy revealed 45-50 nm BK virions clearly visible within the cells. Subsequent to infection, encapsidated BK virus was detected in the supernatant. Conclusion: We thus demonstrated that BKV was detected in oral fluids and that BK infection and replication occur in vitro in salivary gland cells. These data collectively suggest the potential for BKV oral route of transmission and oral pathogenesis.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)
  2. Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21357564
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 394; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2009.07.022; PII: S0042-6822(09)00426-7; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FLUIDS; GANGLIOSIDES; INFECTIVITY; ORAL CAVITY; PATHOGENESIS; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION; SALIVA; SALIVARY GLANDS; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; VIRUSES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOHYDRATES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; GENE AMPLIFICATION; GLANDS; GLYCOLIPIDS; LIPIDS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; MICROSCOPY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PARASITES; SACCHARIDES

Citation Formats

Jeffers, Liesl K., Madden, Vicki, Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer@med.unc.ed, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.07.022.
Jeffers, Liesl K., Madden, Vicki, Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer@med.unc.ed, & Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission. United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.07.022.
Jeffers, Liesl K., Madden, Vicki, Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer@med.unc.ed, and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. Wed . "BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission". United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.07.022.
@article{osti_21357564,
title = {BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission},
author = {Jeffers, Liesl K. and Madden, Vicki and Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer@med.unc.ed and Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599},
abstractNote = {Background: In this study, it was determined that BKV is shed in saliva and an in vitro model system was developed whereby BKV can productively infect both submandibular (HSG) and parotid (HSY) salivary gland cell lines. Results: BKV was detected in oral fluids using quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR). BKV infection was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The infectivity of BKV was inhibited by pre-incubation of the virus with gangliosides that saturated the major capsid protein, VP1, halting receptor mediated BKV entry into salivary gland cells. Examination of infected cultures by transmission electron microscopy revealed 45-50 nm BK virions clearly visible within the cells. Subsequent to infection, encapsidated BK virus was detected in the supernatant. Conclusion: We thus demonstrated that BKV was detected in oral fluids and that BK infection and replication occur in vitro in salivary gland cells. These data collectively suggest the potential for BKV oral route of transmission and oral pathogenesis.},
doi = {10.1016/j.virol.2009.07.022},
journal = {Virology},
number = 2,
volume = 394,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 25 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Wed Nov 25 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}
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