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Title: Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site

Abstract

Because of the significant radiological and chemical hazards present at the 216-Z-9 Trench at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, the only practical subsurface characterization methods are those that minimize or control airborne vapors and particles. This study evaluates and compares the performance of two Direct Push Technologies (Hydraulic Hammer Rig (HHR) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT)) with traditional cable tool drilling in similar difficult geologic conditions. The performance was based on the depth of penetration, the ability to collect representative vadose zone soil samples, the penetration rate, and the relative cost. The HHR achieved deeper penetration depths and faster penetration rates than CPT techniques, while still maintaining the waste minimization benefits of direct push technologies. Although cable tool drilling achieved the deepest penetration, the safety and disposal concerns due to the soil cuttings that were generated made this drilling approach both slow and costly compared to the direct push techniques. (authors)

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Vista Engineering Technologies, LLC, Washington (United States)
  2. US Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, Washington (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9 - 332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21326088
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-10-WM-08235
TRN: US10V0478067453
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM'08: Waste Management Symposium 2008 - HLW, TRU, LLW/ILW, Mixed, Hazardous Wastes and Environmental Management - Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2008; Other Information: Country of input: France; 5 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CABLES; DRILLING; HANFORD RESERVATION; HAZARDS; PENETRATION DEPTH; PERFORMANCE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; TOOLS

Citation Formats

Bratton, W., Moser, K., Holm, R., Morse, J., and Tortoso, A.. Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Bratton, W., Moser, K., Holm, R., Morse, J., & Tortoso, A.. Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site. United States.
Bratton, W., Moser, K., Holm, R., Morse, J., and Tortoso, A.. 2008. "Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21326088,
title = {Innovative Direct Push Technologies for Characterization of the 216-Z-9 Trench at DOE's Hanford Site},
author = {Bratton, W. and Moser, K. and Holm, R. and Morse, J. and Tortoso, A.},
abstractNote = {Because of the significant radiological and chemical hazards present at the 216-Z-9 Trench at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site, the only practical subsurface characterization methods are those that minimize or control airborne vapors and particles. This study evaluates and compares the performance of two Direct Push Technologies (Hydraulic Hammer Rig (HHR) and Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT)) with traditional cable tool drilling in similar difficult geologic conditions. The performance was based on the depth of penetration, the ability to collect representative vadose zone soil samples, the penetration rate, and the relative cost. The HHR achieved deeper penetration depths and faster penetration rates than CPT techniques, while still maintaining the waste minimization benefits of direct push technologies. Although cable tool drilling achieved the deepest penetration, the safety and disposal concerns due to the soil cuttings that were generated made this drilling approach both slow and costly compared to the direct push techniques. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • Research and standardization needs in the area of direct push sampling and testing is reviewed. Direct push testing and sampling is a rapidly growing area in environmental site characterization. Direct push active soil gas sampling techniques are well accepted for environmental site investigations in the vadose zone. Standardization efforts are underway. Better guidance is needed on purging, sealing, and avoidance of cross contamination. The cone penetration test is gaining popularity due to its excellent stratigraphic mapping capability and water pressure information. Research is needed to refine hydrostatic pressure measurement capability and prediction of hydraulic conductivity. Discrete point water sampling usingmore » protected screen samplers has gained wide acceptance. Research is needed concerning water sample protection, effective sealing, use of vacuum in low hydraulic conductivity soils. Comparison studies should be done in the laboratory and in the field. The greatest area of research interest is in development of chemical sensors for use in direct push testing. Several promising methods using fiber optic laser technologies are being developed. Successful technology transfer to everyday application in private industry will require sensors be developed into fully tested, rugged, simple modules to be housed in a penetrometer body. Full scale testing under laboratory controlled conditions will help in validation of advanced sensor systems.« less
  • The US Department of Energy is actively seeking innovative technologies from around the world to apply to the waste management and environmental cleanup efforts at all of its sites. Cleanup of these sites will be very expensive. Existing technologies and methods currently available are not sufficient because they are simply unaffordable. New technologies must be found derived from methods that are cheaper, faster, better, and safer. Technologies from other industries that can be adapted to Hanford Site challenges are being evaluated and new technologies are being designed and developed.
  • The US Department of Energy is actively seeking innovative technologies from around the world to apply to the waste management and environmental cleanup efforts at all of its sites. Cleanup of these sites will be very expensive. Existing technologies and methods currently available are not sufficient because they are simply unaffordable. New technologies must be found derived from methods that are cheaper, faster, better, and safer. Technologies from other industries that can be adapted to Hanford Site challenges are being evaluated and new technologies are being designed and developed.
  • To support remediation of Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks, new chemical and physical measurement technologies must be developed and deployed. This is a major task of the Chemistry Analysis Technology Support (CATS) group of the Hanford Corporation. New measurement methods are required for efficient and economical resolution of tank waste safety, waste retrieval, and disposal issues. These development and deployment activities are performed in cooperation with Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. This paper provides an overview of current analytical technologies in progress. The high-level waste at the Hanford Site is chemically complex because of the numerous processesmore » used in past nuclear fuel reprocessing there, and a variety of technologies is required for effective characterization. Programmatic and laboratory operational needs drive the selection of new technologies for characterizing Hanford Site high-level waste, and these technologies are developed for deployment in laboratories, hot cells or in the field. New physical methods, such as the propagating reactive systems screening tool (PRSST) to measure the potential for self-propagating reactions in stored wastes, are being implemented. Technology for sampling and measuring gases trapped within the waste matrix is being used to evaluate flammability hazards associated with gas releases from stored wastes. Application of new inductively coupled plasma and laser ablation mass spectrometry systems at the Hanford Site`s 222-S Laboratory will be described. A Raman spectroscopy probe mounted in a cone penetrometer to measure oxyanions in wastes or soils will be described. The Hanford Site has used large volumes of organic complexants and acids in processing waste, and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) methods have been developed for determining several of the major organic components in complex waste tank matrices. The principles involved, system installation, and results from these and other new technologies will be summarized.« less