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Title: Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications

Abstract

The processing rates of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces {approx}1.36 x 10{sup -5} m/s ({approx}0.02 gpm/ft{sup 2}) of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated significantly higher filter flux for actual waste samples using a small-scale rotary filter. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary micro-filter for radioactive service at SRS. The authors improved the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service. They procured two units using the new design, tested them with simulated SRS wastes, and evaluated the operation of the units. Work to date provides the following conclusions and program status. - The authors modified the design of the filter disks to remove epoxy and Ryton{sup R}. The new design includes welding both stainless steel and ceramic coated stainless steel filter media to a stainless steel support plate. The welded disks were tested in the full-scale unit. They showed good reliability and met filtrate quality requirements. - The authorsmore » modified the design of the unit, making installation and removal easier. The new design uses a modular, one-piece filter stack that is removed simply by disassembly of a flange on the upper (inlet) side of the filter housing. All seals and rotary unions are contained within the removable stack. - While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service conditions is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement of the current seal with an air seal could increase the lifetime to 5 years and is undergoing testing in the current work. - The bottom bushing showed wear due to a misalignment during the manufacture of the filter tank. Replacing the graphite bushing with a more wear resistant material such as a carbide material will increase the lifetime of the bushing. This replacement requires a more wear resistant part or coating to prevent excessive wear of the shaft. The authors are currently conducting testing with the more wear resistant bushing. - The project team plans to use the rotary micro-filter as a filter in advance of an ion exchange process under development for potential deployment in SRS waste tank risers. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9 - 332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21319736
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-10-WM-08131
TRN: US10V0412061927
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM'08: Waste Management Symposium 2008 - HLW, TRU, LLW/ILW, Mixed, Hazardous Wastes and Environmental Management - Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2008; Other Information: Country of input: France; 1 ref
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CERAMICS; DECONTAMINATION; EPOXIDES; FILTERS; GRAPHITE; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; ION EXCHANGE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; SILICON CARBIDES; SIMULATION; STAINLESS STEELS; TANKS; WEAR RESISTANCE

Citation Formats

Poirier, M R, Herman, D T, and Fink, S D. Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Poirier, M R, Herman, D T, & Fink, S D. Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications. United States.
Poirier, M R, Herman, D T, and Fink, S D. 2008. "Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications". United States.
@article{osti_21319736,
title = {Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications},
author = {Poirier, M R and Herman, D T and Fink, S D},
abstractNote = {The processing rates of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces {approx}1.36 x 10{sup -5} m/s ({approx}0.02 gpm/ft{sup 2}) of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated significantly higher filter flux for actual waste samples using a small-scale rotary filter. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary micro-filter for radioactive service at SRS. The authors improved the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service. They procured two units using the new design, tested them with simulated SRS wastes, and evaluated the operation of the units. Work to date provides the following conclusions and program status. - The authors modified the design of the filter disks to remove epoxy and Ryton{sup R}. The new design includes welding both stainless steel and ceramic coated stainless steel filter media to a stainless steel support plate. The welded disks were tested in the full-scale unit. They showed good reliability and met filtrate quality requirements. - The authors modified the design of the unit, making installation and removal easier. The new design uses a modular, one-piece filter stack that is removed simply by disassembly of a flange on the upper (inlet) side of the filter housing. All seals and rotary unions are contained within the removable stack. - While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service conditions is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement of the current seal with an air seal could increase the lifetime to 5 years and is undergoing testing in the current work. - The bottom bushing showed wear due to a misalignment during the manufacture of the filter tank. Replacing the graphite bushing with a more wear resistant material such as a carbide material will increase the lifetime of the bushing. This replacement requires a more wear resistant part or coating to prevent excessive wear of the shaft. The authors are currently conducting testing with the more wear resistant bushing. - The project team plans to use the rotary micro-filter as a filter in advance of an ion exchange process under development for potential deployment in SRS waste tank risers. (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21319736}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {7}
}

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