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Title: Integration of 'omics technologies for characterization of complex microbial ecosystems

Abstract

Environmental remediation sites possess complexity at both biotic and abiotic levels, with temporal shifts that are associated with the interaction of both systems. Single scientific disciplines no longer serve to address and understand the complex nature of these sites. An integration of physical, chemical, and biological characterizations or a more inclusive environmental systems approach is needed. As a proof of concept, an integrated approach was developed to identify bio-signatures from a complex environmental community to provide sensitive, early indicators and predictors of response to radionuclide and chemical exposures of interest for environmental management. Specifically, the integrated approach used a combination of genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and computational statistics to characterize a complex periphyton community following uranium exposure. This additional, specific information has promise to further reduce uncertainties in environmental remediation and monitoring in realizing the potential impacts of exposure in advance to reduce potential mitigation efforts. Results from this study establish a basis for bio-signature characterization of any ecosystem for comparison or monitoring of biotic exposure and effects in response to a specific contaminant. (authors)

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, 1628 E. Southern Avenue, Suite 9 - 332, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21319734
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-10-WM-08119
TRN: US10V0404061925
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM'08: Waste Management Symposium 2008 - HLW, TRU, LLW/ILW, Mixed, Hazardous Wastes and Environmental Management - Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 24-28 Feb 2008; Other Information: Country of input: France; 18 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AUFWUCHS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ECOSYSTEMS; INDICATORS; REMEDIAL ACTION; URANIUM

Citation Formats

Miracle, A.L., Bailey, V.L., Baker, S.E., Bunn, A.L., Magnuson, J., and Webb-Robertson, B.J. Integration of 'omics technologies for characterization of complex microbial ecosystems. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Miracle, A.L., Bailey, V.L., Baker, S.E., Bunn, A.L., Magnuson, J., & Webb-Robertson, B.J. Integration of 'omics technologies for characterization of complex microbial ecosystems. United States.
Miracle, A.L., Bailey, V.L., Baker, S.E., Bunn, A.L., Magnuson, J., and Webb-Robertson, B.J. 2008. "Integration of 'omics technologies for characterization of complex microbial ecosystems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21319734,
title = {Integration of 'omics technologies for characterization of complex microbial ecosystems},
author = {Miracle, A.L. and Bailey, V.L. and Baker, S.E. and Bunn, A.L. and Magnuson, J. and Webb-Robertson, B.J.},
abstractNote = {Environmental remediation sites possess complexity at both biotic and abiotic levels, with temporal shifts that are associated with the interaction of both systems. Single scientific disciplines no longer serve to address and understand the complex nature of these sites. An integration of physical, chemical, and biological characterizations or a more inclusive environmental systems approach is needed. As a proof of concept, an integrated approach was developed to identify bio-signatures from a complex environmental community to provide sensitive, early indicators and predictors of response to radionuclide and chemical exposures of interest for environmental management. Specifically, the integrated approach used a combination of genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and computational statistics to characterize a complex periphyton community following uranium exposure. This additional, specific information has promise to further reduce uncertainties in environmental remediation and monitoring in realizing the potential impacts of exposure in advance to reduce potential mitigation efforts. Results from this study establish a basis for bio-signature characterization of any ecosystem for comparison or monitoring of biotic exposure and effects in response to a specific contaminant. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • Environmental remediation sites possess complexity at both biotic and abiotic levels, with temporal shifts that are associated with the interaction of both systems. Single scientific disciplines no longer serve to address and understand the complex nature of these sites. An integration of physical, chemical, and biological characterizations or a more inclusive environmental systems approach is needed. As a proof of concept, an integrated approach was developed to identify biosignatures from a complex environmental community to provide sensitive, early indicators and predictors of response to radionuclide and chemical exposures of interest for environmental management. Specifically, the integrated approach used a combinationmore » of genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and computational statistics to characterize a complex periphyton community following uranium exposure. This additional, specific information has promise to further reduce uncertainties in environmental remediation and monitoring in realizing the potential impacts of exposure in advance to reduce potential mitigation efforts. Results from this study establish a basis for biosignature characterization of any ecosystem for comparison or monitoring of biotic exposure and effects in response to a specific contaminant.« less
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