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Title: Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant capecitabine, concomitant to radiotherapy, followed by capecitabine monotherapy, in operable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by measuring pathologic response and conservative surgery rate, toxicity profile, and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to July 2006, a total of 51 patients affected by LARC (T3-T4 or any node positive tumor), received capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily continuously) concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis (50.4 Gy/ 28 fractions), followed by two cycles of capecitabine (1,250 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily, 14 days on 7 days off) up until 2 weeks before surgery. Tailored adjuvant systemic treatment was discussed according to pathologic stage. Results: Of 51 patients, (median age 61 years, range 38-82 years; 19 women and 32 men; ECOG performance status 0/1/2: 46/4/1), 50 were evaluable for response: 18% complete pathologic remission; 12% T-downstaging, and 30% N-downstaging. One patient died before surgery from mesenteric stroke. Grade 3 acute toxicities were 2% diarrhea, 8% dermatitis, 2% liver function test elevation, and 2% hand-foot syndrome. Sphincter preservation rates for tumors {<=}6 cm from the anal verge were 62% and 80% for the whole population. Median follow up was 43.0 months (range 0.8-68.6more » months). Five-years DFS was 85.4% (95% CI = 75.3-95.4%). Conclusions: Based on our study results, we conclude that this regimen is well tolerated and active and compares favorably with existing capecitabine-based approaches.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]; ;  [5];  [6];  [7];  [2];  [3];  [8]; ;  [2]
  1. Medical Care Unit, Department of Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy), E-mail: maria.zampino@ieo.it
  2. Medical Care Unit, Department of Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  3. Radiotherapy Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  4. Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  5. General Surgery Department, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  6. Radiology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  7. Endoscopy Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)
  8. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21282042
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.002; PII: S0360-3016(08)03691-2; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DERMATITIS; DIARRHEA; FEET; HANDS; LIVER; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PELVIS; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Zampino, Maria Giulia, Magni, Elena, Leonardi, Maria Cristina, Petazzi, Elena, Santoro, Luigi, Luca, Fabrizio, Chiappa, Antonio, Petralia, Giuseppe, Trovato, Cristina, Fazio, Nicola, Orecchia, Roberto, University of Milan, Nole, Franco, and Braud, Filippo de. Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.002.
Zampino, Maria Giulia, Magni, Elena, Leonardi, Maria Cristina, Petazzi, Elena, Santoro, Luigi, Luca, Fabrizio, Chiappa, Antonio, Petralia, Giuseppe, Trovato, Cristina, Fazio, Nicola, Orecchia, Roberto, University of Milan, Nole, Franco, & Braud, Filippo de. Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.002.
Zampino, Maria Giulia, Magni, Elena, Leonardi, Maria Cristina, Petazzi, Elena, Santoro, Luigi, Luca, Fabrizio, Chiappa, Antonio, Petralia, Giuseppe, Trovato, Cristina, Fazio, Nicola, Orecchia, Roberto, University of Milan, Nole, Franco, and Braud, Filippo de. Thu . "Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.002.
@article{osti_21282042,
title = {Capecitabine Initially Concomitant to Radiotherapy Then Perioperatively Administered in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer},
author = {Zampino, Maria Giulia and Magni, Elena and Leonardi, Maria Cristina and Petazzi, Elena and Santoro, Luigi and Luca, Fabrizio and Chiappa, Antonio and Petralia, Giuseppe and Trovato, Cristina and Fazio, Nicola and Orecchia, Roberto and University of Milan and Nole, Franco and Braud, Filippo de},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant capecitabine, concomitant to radiotherapy, followed by capecitabine monotherapy, in operable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by measuring pathologic response and conservative surgery rate, toxicity profile, and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to July 2006, a total of 51 patients affected by LARC (T3-T4 or any node positive tumor), received capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily continuously) concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis (50.4 Gy/ 28 fractions), followed by two cycles of capecitabine (1,250 mg/m{sup 2}, orally, twice daily, 14 days on 7 days off) up until 2 weeks before surgery. Tailored adjuvant systemic treatment was discussed according to pathologic stage. Results: Of 51 patients, (median age 61 years, range 38-82 years; 19 women and 32 men; ECOG performance status 0/1/2: 46/4/1), 50 were evaluable for response: 18% complete pathologic remission; 12% T-downstaging, and 30% N-downstaging. One patient died before surgery from mesenteric stroke. Grade 3 acute toxicities were 2% diarrhea, 8% dermatitis, 2% liver function test elevation, and 2% hand-foot syndrome. Sphincter preservation rates for tumors {<=}6 cm from the anal verge were 62% and 80% for the whole population. Median follow up was 43.0 months (range 0.8-68.6 months). Five-years DFS was 85.4% (95% CI = 75.3-95.4%). Conclusions: Based on our study results, we conclude that this regimen is well tolerated and active and compares favorably with existing capecitabine-based approaches.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.11.002},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Thu Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative {>=}T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age,more » 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor {<=}5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery wasmore » performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).« less
  • Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consistingmore » of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen as induction, concomitant, and consolidation chemotherapy to the conventional radiation is well tolerated. The strategy is highly effective in terms of pCR and major regression, which warrants further investigation.« less
  • Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided intomore » Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age {>=}18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume inmore » 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation.« less