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Title: Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p =more » .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [4];  [5]
  1. Department of Radiation Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)
  2. (A.R.T.T.), Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States), E-mail: Nina.Mayr@osumc.edu
  3. (A.R.T.T.), Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)
  4. Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy (A.R.T.T.), Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)
  5. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21276952
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.09.050; PII: S0360-3016(08)03556-6; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD; CHEMOTHERAPY; HEMOGLOBIN; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Mayr, Nina A., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Wang, Jian Z., Zhang Dongqing, Montebello, Joseph F., Grecula, John C., Lo, Simon S., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Fowler, Jeffery M., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Yuh, William T.C., and Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.09.050.
Mayr, Nina A., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Wang, Jian Z., Zhang Dongqing, Montebello, Joseph F., Grecula, John C., Lo, Simon S., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Fowler, Jeffery M., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Yuh, William T.C., & Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.09.050.
Mayr, Nina A., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Wang, Jian Z., Zhang Dongqing, Montebello, Joseph F., Grecula, John C., Lo, Simon S., Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy, Fowler, Jeffery M., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Yuh, William T.C., and Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. 2009. "Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.09.050.
@article{osti_21276952,
title = {Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer},
author = {Mayr, Nina A. and Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy and Wang, Jian Z. and Zhang Dongqing and Montebello, Joseph F. and Grecula, John C. and Lo, Simon S. and Center for Advanced Radiation Technology and Therapy and Fowler, Jeffery M. and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH and Yuh, William T.C. and Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.09.050},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 8
}
  • Purpose: To study the temporal changes of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) perfusion patterns during the radiation therapy (RT) course and their influence on local control and survival in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: DCE-MRI was performed in 98 patients with Stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer before RT (pre-RT) and during early RT (20-25 Gy) and mid-RT (45-50 Gy). Signal intensity (SI) from the DCE-MRI time-SI curve was derived for each tumor voxel. The poorly perfused low-DCE tumor subregions were quantified as lower 10th percentiles of SI (SI10). Local control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were correlated with DCEmore » parameters at pre-RT, early RT, and mid-RT. Median follow-up was 4.9 (range, 0.2-9.0) years. Results: Patients (16/98) with initial pre-RT high DCE (SI10 >=2.1) had 100% 5-year local control, 81% disease-specific survival, and 81% overall survival, compared with only 79%, 61%, and 55%, respectively, in patients with pre-RT low DCE. Conversion from pre-RT low DCE to high DCE in early RT (28/82 patients) was associated with higher local control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival (93%, 74%, and 67%, respectively). In comparison with all other groups, outcome was worst in patients with persistently low DCE from pre-RT throughout the mid-RT phase (66%, 44%, and 43%; p = 0.003, 0.003, and 0.020; respectively). Conclusion: Longitudinal tumor perfusion changes during RT correlate with treatment outcome. Persistently low perfusion in pre-RT, early RT, and mid-RT indicates a high risk of treatment failure, whereas outcome is favorable in patients with initially high perfusion or subsequent improvements of initially low perfusion. These findings likely reflect reoxygenation and may have potential for noninvasive monitoring of intra-treatment radio-responsiveness and for guiding adaptive therapy.« less
  • Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery andmore » center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p = 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center.« less
  • Purpose: To express the magnitude of the contribution of chemotherapy to local tumor control in chemoradiotherapy cervical cancer trials in terms of the concept of the biologically effective dose. Methods and Materials: The local control rates of both arms of each study (radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus chemotherapy) reported from randomized controlled trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer were reviewed and expressed using the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) as TCP = exp(-exp E), where E is the logarithm of cell kill. By combining the two TCP values from each study, we calculated the chemotherapy-related log cell killmore » as Ec = ln[(lnTCP{sub Radiotherapy})/(lnTCP{sub Chemoradiotherapy})]. Assuming a range of radiosensitivities ({alpha} = 0.1-0.5 Gy{sup -1}) and taking the calculated log cell kill, we calculated the chemotherapy-BED, and using the linear quadratic model, the number of 2-Gy fractions corresponding to each BED. The effect of a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities ({alpha} Gy{sup -1}) on the TCP was also explored. Results: The chemotherapy-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions range was 0.2-4 and was greater in tumors with lower radiosensitivity. In those tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity ({alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}), the equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions was 0.6-1.3, corresponding to 120-260 cGy of extra dose. The opportunities for clinically detectable improvement are only available in tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity with {alpha} = 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. The dependence of TCP on the tumor volume decreases as the radiosensitivity increases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the contribution of chemotherapy to the TCP in cervical cancer is expected to be clinically detectable in larger and less-radiosensitive tumors.« less
  • Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2more » Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dosemore » in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.« less