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Title: Back to the FutureGen?

Abstract

After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21261606
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; USA; FINANCING; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ZERO EMISSIONS TECHNOLOGIES

Citation Formats

Buchsbaum, L. Back to the FutureGen?. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Buchsbaum, L. Back to the FutureGen?. United States.
Buchsbaum, L. 2009. "Back to the FutureGen?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21261606,
title = {Back to the FutureGen?},
author = {Buchsbaum, L.},
abstractNote = {After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 4,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 4
}
  • FutureGen 2.0 site will be the first near-zero emission power plant with fully integrated long-term storage in a deep, non-potable saline aquifer in the United States. The proposed FutureGen 2.0 CO 2 storage site is located in northeast Morgan County, Illinois, U.S.A., forty-eight kilometres from the Meredosia Energy Center where a large-scale oxy-combustion demonstration will be conducted. The demonstration will involve > 90% carbon capture, which will produce more than one million metric tons (MMT) of CO 2 per year. The CO 2 will be compressed at the power plant and transported via pipeline to the storage site. To examinemore » CO 2 storage potential of the site, a 1,467m characterization well (FGA#1) was completed in December 2011. The target reservoir for CO 2 storage is the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Elmhurst Sandstone Member of the lower Eau Claire Formation for a combined thickness of 176 m. Confining beds of the overlying Lombard and Proviso Members (upper Eau Claire Formation) reach a thickness of 126 m. Characterization of the target injection zone and the overlying confining zone was based on wellbore data, cores, and geophysical logs, along with surface geophysical (2-D seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity), and structural data collected during the initial stage of the project . Based on this geological model, 3D simulations of CO 2 injection and redistribution were conducted using STOMP-CO 2, a multiphase flow and transport simulator. After this characterization stage, it appears that the injection site is a suitable geologic system for CO 2 sequestration and that the injection zone is sufficient to receive up to 33 MMT of CO 2 at a rate of 1.1 MMT/yr. GHGT-11 conference« less
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  • Geochemical monitoring is an essential component of a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect possible loss of containment at the FutureGen 2.0 geologic sequestration site near Jacksonville, IL. This presentation gives an overview of the potential geochemical approaches and tracer technologies that were considered, and describes the evaluation process by which the most cost-effective and robust of these were selected for implementation
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