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Title: Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter

Abstract

We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Theory Group, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)
  2. Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21250848
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.78.063540; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ABUNDANCE; ANNIHILATION; CROSS SECTIONS; DETECTION; GAMMA RADIATION; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PARTICLE DECAY; POSITRONS

Citation Formats

Nagai, Minoru, and Nakayama, Kazunori. Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.78.063540.
Nagai, Minoru, & Nakayama, Kazunori. Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.78.063540.
Nagai, Minoru, and Nakayama, Kazunori. 2008. "Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.78.063540.
@article{osti_21250848,
title = {Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter},
author = {Nagai, Minoru and Nakayama, Kazunori},
abstractNote = {We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.78.063540},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 6,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 9
}
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