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Title: Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

Abstract

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21240331
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; Journal Volume: 59; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MITIGATION; CLIMATIC CHANGE; CARBON DIOXIDE; POWER GENERATION; COAL; CAPTURE; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; SECTORAL ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Frank Princiotta. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.3155/1047-3289.59.10.1194.
Frank Princiotta. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge. United States. doi:10.3155/1047-3289.59.10.1194.
Frank Princiotta. 2009. "Global climate change and the mitigation challenge". United States. doi:10.3155/1047-3289.59.10.1194.
@article{osti_21240331,
title = {Global climate change and the mitigation challenge},
author = {Frank Princiotta},
abstractNote = {Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {10.3155/1047-3289.59.10.1194},
journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association},
number = 10,
volume = 59,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
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