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Title: Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves

Abstract

Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2{sigma}more » upper limit w<-1.10, and including the Hubble Space Telescope prior, we obtain w<-1.14, which is only marginally consistent with limits derived from the Supernova Legacy Survey sample. On the other hand, we infer larger limits for nonflat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis, we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l{sub a} of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8102, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France)
  2. Dipartimento di Fisica e Sezione INFN, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21210181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. D, Particles Fields
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 77; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.77.103507; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0556-2821
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ANISOTROPY; COSMOLOGY; EQUATIONS OF STATE; MARKOV PROCESS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; MULTIPOLES; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; OSCILLATIONS; PHASE SHIFT; RECOMBINATION; RELICT RADIATION; SCATTERING; SOUND WAVES; SPECTRA; SUPERNOVAE; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Corasaniti, Pier Stefano, Melchiorri, Alessandro, and CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23. Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.77.103507.
Corasaniti, Pier Stefano, Melchiorri, Alessandro, & CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23. Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.77.103507.
Corasaniti, Pier Stefano, Melchiorri, Alessandro, and CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23. Thu . "Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.77.103507.
@article{osti_21210181,
title = {Testing cosmology with cosmic sound waves},
author = {Corasaniti, Pier Stefano and Melchiorri, Alessandro and CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23},
abstractNote = {Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However prerecombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects, we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peak and dip multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast, the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis of the location of WMAP extrema to constrain, in combination with recent BAO data, a constant dark energy equation of state parameter w. For a flat universe we find a strong 2{sigma} upper limit w<-1.10, and including the Hubble Space Telescope prior, we obtain w<-1.14, which is only marginally consistent with limits derived from the Supernova Legacy Survey sample. On the other hand, we infer larger limits for nonflat cosmologies. From the full CMB likelihood analysis, we also estimate the values of the shift parameter R and the multipole l{sub a} of the acoustic horizon at decoupling for several cosmologies, to test their dependence on model assumptions. Although the analysis of the full CMB spectra should always be preferred, using the position of the CMB peaks and dips provides a simple and consistent method for combining CMB constraints with other data sets.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.77.103507},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
issn = {0556-2821},
number = 10,
volume = 77,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {5}
}