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Title: Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

Abstract

Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Istituto di Fisica Cosmica e Informatica-CNR-Palermo (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21199260
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 433; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.56132; (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CHERENKOV COUNTERS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; COSMIC NEUTRINOS; COSMIC RAY DETECTION; EEV RANGE; ENERGY SPECTRA; FLUORESCENCE; NEUTRINO DETECTION; SHOWER COUNTERS; SPACE

Citation Formats

Scarsi, Livio, and Dipartimento di Energetica e Fisica Applicata, University of Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153--90146 Palermo. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.1063/1.56132.
Scarsi, Livio, & Dipartimento di Energetica e Fisica Applicata, University of Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153--90146 Palermo. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays. United States. doi:10.1063/1.56132.
Scarsi, Livio, and Dipartimento di Energetica e Fisica Applicata, University of Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153--90146 Palermo. 1998. "Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays". United States. doi:10.1063/1.56132.
@article{osti_21199260,
title = {Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays},
author = {Scarsi, Livio and Dipartimento di Energetica e Fisica Applicata, University of Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153--90146 Palermo},
abstractNote = {Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.},
doi = {10.1063/1.56132},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 433,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month = 6
}
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