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Title: Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate

Abstract

A nuclear power megaproject carries with it severe business risks. Despite attempts to shift these risks to taxpayers and ratepayers, ultimately there are no guarantees for utility shareholders. Utility management needs to keep some core principles in mind. (author)

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21195809
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; FINANCING; BUSINESS; COST; MANAGEMENT; ELECTRIC UTILITIES

Citation Formats

Severance, Craig A. Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.010.
Severance, Craig A. Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.010.
Severance, Craig A. 2009. "Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.010.
@article{osti_21195809,
title = {Business risks to utilities as new nuclear power costs escalate},
author = {Severance, Craig A.},
abstractNote = {A nuclear power megaproject carries with it severe business risks. Despite attempts to shift these risks to taxpayers and ratepayers, ultimately there are no guarantees for utility shareholders. Utility management needs to keep some core principles in mind. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.010},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 4,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 5
}
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