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Title: Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations

Abstract

The value assigned to CCS depends on the type of greenhouse gas regulation chosen and details of how the market is implemented. This article describes some ways in which CCS can be incorporated into greenhouse gas regulations, together with their implications, and how CCS is treated in current regulations for regulated entities. (author)

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21195802
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; REGULATIONS; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; ECONOMICS; GREENHOUSE GASES; MARKET

Citation Formats

Lokey, Elizabeth. Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.014.
Lokey, Elizabeth. Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.014.
Lokey, Elizabeth. Fri . "Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.014.
@article{osti_21195802,
title = {Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations},
author = {Lokey, Elizabeth},
abstractNote = {The value assigned to CCS depends on the type of greenhouse gas regulation chosen and details of how the market is implemented. This article describes some ways in which CCS can be incorporated into greenhouse gas regulations, together with their implications, and how CCS is treated in current regulations for regulated entities. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.TEJ.2009.03.014},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 4,
volume = 22,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Fri May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}
  • When carbon capture and sequestration is conducted by entities that are not regulated, it could be counted as an offset that is fungible in the market or sold to a voluntary market. This paper addresses the complications that arise in accounting for carbon capture and sequestration as an offset, and methodologies that exist for accounting for CCS in voluntary and compliance markets. (author)
  • Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations has quickly emerged as an important option for reducing greenhouse emissions. If CCS is implemented on the scale needed for large reductions in CO2 emissions, a billion of tonnes or more of CO2 will be sequestered annually a 250 fold increase over the amount sequestered annually today. Sequestering these large volumes will require a strong scientific foundation of the coupled hydrological-geochemical-geomechanical processes that govern the long term fate of CO2 in the subsurface. Methods to characterize and select sequestration sites, subsurface engineering to optimize performance and cost, safe operations, monitoringmore » technology, remediation methods, regulatory oversight, and an institutional approach for managing long term liability are also needed.« less
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  • Pure, amine-derivatized and nickel-doped sol-gel silica membranes have been developed on tubular Membralox-type commercial ceramic supports for the purpose of carbon dioxide separation from nitrogen under coal-fired power plant flue gas conditions. An extensive synthetic and permeation test study was carried out in order to optimize membrane CO{sub 2} permeance, CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor and resistance against densification. Pure silica membranes prepared under optimized conditions exhibited an attractive combination of CO{sub 2} permeance of 2.0 MPU (1 MPU = 1 cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm{sup -2} min{sup -1} atm{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor of 80 with amore » dry 10:90 (v/v) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} feed at 25 C. However, these membranes exhibited flux decline phenomena under prolonged exposure to humidified feeds, especially in the presence of trace SO{sub 2} gas in the feed. Doping the membranes with nickel (II) nitrate salt was effective in retarding densification, as manifested by combined higher permeance and higher separation factor of the doped membrane compared to the pure (undoped) silica membrane after 168 hours exposure to simulated flue gas conditions.« less
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