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Title: Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations

Abstract

The gravity-mode (g-mode) eigenfrequencies of newly born strange quark stars (SQSs) and neutron stars (NSs) are studied. It is found that the eigenfrequencies in SQSs are much lower than those in NSs by almost 1 order of magnitude, since the components of a SQS are all extremely relativistic particles while nucleons in a NS are nonrelativistic. We therefore propose that newly born SQSs can be distinguished from the NSs by detecting the eigenfrequencies of the g-mode pulsations of supernovae cores through gravitational radiation by LIGO-class detectors.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)
  2. oLambda, Inc., Sunnyvale, California 94089 (United States)
  3. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21179857
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 101; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.181102; (c) 2008 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; EIGENFREQUENCY; GRAVITATION; GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION; NEUTRON STARS; NUCLEONS; OSCILLATION MODES; PULSATIONS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; S QUARKS; STAR EVOLUTION

Citation Formats

Fu Weijie, Wei Haiqing, Liu Yuxin, and Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000. Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.101.181102.
Fu Weijie, Wei Haiqing, Liu Yuxin, & Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000. Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.101.181102.
Fu Weijie, Wei Haiqing, Liu Yuxin, and Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000. 2008. "Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.101.181102.
@article{osti_21179857,
title = {Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations},
author = {Fu Weijie and Wei Haiqing and Liu Yuxin and Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000},
abstractNote = {The gravity-mode (g-mode) eigenfrequencies of newly born strange quark stars (SQSs) and neutron stars (NSs) are studied. It is found that the eigenfrequencies in SQSs are much lower than those in NSs by almost 1 order of magnitude, since the components of a SQS are all extremely relativistic particles while nucleons in a NS are nonrelativistic. We therefore propose that newly born SQSs can be distinguished from the NSs by detecting the eigenfrequencies of the g-mode pulsations of supernovae cores through gravitational radiation by LIGO-class detectors.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.101.181102},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 18,
volume = 101,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month =
}
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