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Title: Interferometric null test of a deep parabolic reflector generating a Hertzian dipole field

Abstract

We report on interferometric characterization of a deep parabolic mirror with a depth of more than five times its focal length. The interferometer is of Fizeau type; its core consists of the mirror itself, a spherical null element, and a reference flat. Because of the extreme solid angle produced by the paraboloid, the alignment of the setup appears to be very critical and needs auxiliary systems for control. Aberrations caused by misalignments are removed via fitting of suitable functionals provided by means of ray tracing simulations. It turns out that the usual misalignment approximations fail under these extreme conditions.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21175678
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 30; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/AO.47.005570; (c) 2008 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; APPROXIMATIONS; AUXILIARY SYSTEMS; DIPOLES; FUNCTIONALS; INTERFEROMETERS; INTERFEROMETRY; PARABOLIC REFLECTORS; SIMULATION; SPHERICAL CONFIGURATION

Citation Formats

Leuchs, Gerd, Mantel, Klaus, Berger, Andreas, Konermann, Hildegard, Sondermann, Markus, Peschel, Ulf, Lindlein, Norbert, and Schwider, Johannes. Interferometric null test of a deep parabolic reflector generating a Hertzian dipole field. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.47.005570.
Leuchs, Gerd, Mantel, Klaus, Berger, Andreas, Konermann, Hildegard, Sondermann, Markus, Peschel, Ulf, Lindlein, Norbert, & Schwider, Johannes. Interferometric null test of a deep parabolic reflector generating a Hertzian dipole field. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.47.005570.
Leuchs, Gerd, Mantel, Klaus, Berger, Andreas, Konermann, Hildegard, Sondermann, Markus, Peschel, Ulf, Lindlein, Norbert, and Schwider, Johannes. Mon . "Interferometric null test of a deep parabolic reflector generating a Hertzian dipole field". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.47.005570.
@article{osti_21175678,
title = {Interferometric null test of a deep parabolic reflector generating a Hertzian dipole field},
author = {Leuchs, Gerd and Mantel, Klaus and Berger, Andreas and Konermann, Hildegard and Sondermann, Markus and Peschel, Ulf and Lindlein, Norbert and Schwider, Johannes},
abstractNote = {We report on interferometric characterization of a deep parabolic mirror with a depth of more than five times its focal length. The interferometer is of Fizeau type; its core consists of the mirror itself, a spherical null element, and a reference flat. Because of the extreme solid angle produced by the paraboloid, the alignment of the setup appears to be very critical and needs auxiliary systems for control. Aberrations caused by misalignments are removed via fitting of suitable functionals provided by means of ray tracing simulations. It turns out that the usual misalignment approximations fail under these extreme conditions.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.47.005570},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 30,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Oct 20 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Mon Oct 20 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}
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