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Title: Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the influence of magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI)-vs. computed-tomography (CT)-based prostate and normal structure delineation on the dose to the target and organs at risk during proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were simulated in the supine position using both CT and T2 MRI. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on both imaging modalities. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the delineated prostates with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superior and inferior margin. Two plans were generated and analyzed for each patient: an MRI plan based on the MRI-delineated PTV, and a CT plan based on the CT-delineated PTV. Doses of 78 Gy equivalents (GE) were prescribed to the PTV. Results: Doses to normal structures were lower when MRI was used to delineate the rectum and bladder compared with CT: bladder V50 was 15.3% lower (p = 0.04), and rectum V50 was 23.9% lower (p = 0.003). Poor agreement on the definition of the prostate apex was seen between CT and MRI (p = 0.007). The CT-defined prostate apex was within 2 mm of the apex on MRI only 35.7% of the time. Coverage of the MRI-delineated PTV was significantly decreased with the CT-based plan: themore » minimum dose to the PTV was reduced by 43% (p < 0.001), and the PTV V99% was reduced by 11% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MRI to delineate the prostate results in more accurate target definition and a smaller target volume compared with CT, allowing for improved target coverage and decreased doses to critical normal structures.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [1]; ;  [3];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  2. University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States), E-mail: c2002@ufl.edu
  3. University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21172502
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.031; PII: S0360-3016(08)00509-9; Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLADDER; CARCINOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; NMR IMAGING; PLANNING; PROSTATE; PROTONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION HAZARDS; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Yeung, Anamaria R., Vargas, Carlos E., Falchook, Aaron, Louis, Debbie C., Olivier, Kenneth, Keole, Sameer, Yeung, Daniel, Mendenhall, Nancy P., and Li Zuofeng. Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.031.
Yeung, Anamaria R., Vargas, Carlos E., Falchook, Aaron, Louis, Debbie C., Olivier, Kenneth, Keole, Sameer, Yeung, Daniel, Mendenhall, Nancy P., & Li Zuofeng. Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.031.
Yeung, Anamaria R., Vargas, Carlos E., Falchook, Aaron, Louis, Debbie C., Olivier, Kenneth, Keole, Sameer, Yeung, Daniel, Mendenhall, Nancy P., and Li Zuofeng. 2008. "Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.031.
@article{osti_21172502,
title = {Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy},
author = {Yeung, Anamaria R. and Vargas, Carlos E. and Falchook, Aaron and Louis, Debbie C. and Olivier, Kenneth and Keole, Sameer and Yeung, Daniel and Mendenhall, Nancy P. and Li Zuofeng},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the influence of magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI)-vs. computed-tomography (CT)-based prostate and normal structure delineation on the dose to the target and organs at risk during proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were simulated in the supine position using both CT and T2 MRI. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on both imaging modalities. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the delineated prostates with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superior and inferior margin. Two plans were generated and analyzed for each patient: an MRI plan based on the MRI-delineated PTV, and a CT plan based on the CT-delineated PTV. Doses of 78 Gy equivalents (GE) were prescribed to the PTV. Results: Doses to normal structures were lower when MRI was used to delineate the rectum and bladder compared with CT: bladder V50 was 15.3% lower (p = 0.04), and rectum V50 was 23.9% lower (p = 0.003). Poor agreement on the definition of the prostate apex was seen between CT and MRI (p = 0.007). The CT-defined prostate apex was within 2 mm of the apex on MRI only 35.7% of the time. Coverage of the MRI-delineated PTV was significantly decreased with the CT-based plan: the minimum dose to the PTV was reduced by 43% (p < 0.001), and the PTV V99% was reduced by 11% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MRI to delineate the prostate results in more accurate target definition and a smaller target volume compared with CT, allowing for improved target coverage and decreased doses to critical normal structures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.03.031},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month =
}
  • Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT), multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), and a combination of both techniques for the detection of local recurrence of prostate cancer initially treated by radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective, single-institution study of 32 patients with suspected prostate cancer recurrence who underwent both FCH-PET/CT and 3T mpMRI within 3 months of one another for the detection of recurrence. All included patients had to be cleared for metastatic recurrence. The reference procedure was systematic 3-dimensional (3D)-transperineal prostate biopsy for the final assessment of local recurrence.more » Both imaging modalities were analyzed by 2 experienced readers blinded to clinical data. The analysis was made per-patient and per-segment using a 4-segment model. Results: The median prostate-specific antigen value at the time of imaging was 2.92 ng/mL. The mean prostate-specific antigen doubling time was 14 months. Of the 32 patients, 31 had a positive 3D-transperineal mapping biopsy for a local relapse. On a patient-based analysis, the detection rate was 71% (22 of 31) for mpMRI and 74% (23 of 31) for FCH-PET/CT. On a segment-based analysis, the sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 32% and 87% for mpMRI, 34% and 87% for FCH-PET/CT, and 43% and 83% for the combined analysis of both techniques. Accuracy was 64%, 65%, and 66%, respectively. The interobserver agreement was κ = 0.92 for FCH-PET/CT and κ = 0.74 for mpMRI. Conclusions: Both mpMRI and FCH-PET/CT show limited sensitivity but good specificity for the detection of local cancer recurrence after radiation therapy, when compared with 3D-transperineal mapping biopsy. Prostate biopsy still seems to be mandatory to diagnose local relapse and select patients who could benefit from local salvage therapy.« less
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  • Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodesmore » by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.« less
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  • Purpose: To determine whether a relationship exists between the tumor volume (TV) or relative choline content determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) at 3T and the clinical prognostic parameters for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: A total of 72 men (mean age, 67.8 {+-} 6.2 years) were stratified as having low-risk (n = 26), intermediate-risk (n = 24), or high-risk (n = 22) PCa. MRSI was performed at 3T using a phased-array coil. Spectra are expressed as the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamines plus creatine/citrate ratios. The mean ratiomore » of the most pathologic voxels and the MRSI-based TV were also determined. Results: The mean values of the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamine plus creatine/citrate ratios were greater for Stage T2b or greater tumors vs. Stage T2a or less tumors: 7.53 {+-} 13.60 vs. 2.31 {+-} 5.65 (p = .018), 8.98 {+-} 14.58 vs. 2.56 {+-} 5.70 (p = .016), and 10.32 {+-} 15.47 vs. 3.55 {+-} 6.16 (p = .014), respectively. The mean MRSI-based TV for Stage T2b or greater and Stage T2a or less tumors was significantly different (2.23 {+-} 2.62 cm{sup 3} vs. 1.26 {+-} 2.06 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = .030). This TV correlated with increased prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.293; p = .012). Patients with high-risk PCa had a larger TV than did the patients with intermediate-risk PCa. A similar result was found for the intermediate-risk group compared with the low-risk group (odds ratio, 1.225; p = .041). Conclusion: Biomarkers expressing the relative choline content and TV were significant parameters for the localization of PCa and could be helpful for determining the prognosis more accurately.« less