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Title: In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR

Abstract

In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate designmore » features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States)
  2. Center for Risk Studies and Safety, University of California Santa Barbara (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Nuclear Society, 555 North Kensington Avenue, La Grange Park, IL 60526 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21167938
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICAPP'02: 2002 International congress on advances in nuclear power plants, Hollywood, FL (United States), 9-13 Jun 2002; Other Information: Country of input: France; 9 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; ACCIDENTS; COOLING; CRITICAL HEAT FLUX; DESIGN; HEAT TRANSFER; HEATING LOAD; MANAGEMENT; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; NUCLEATE BOILING; PWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR VESSELS; SURFACES; WATER

Citation Formats

Scobel, James H, Conway, L E, and Theofanous, T G. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Scobel, James H, Conway, L E, & Theofanous, T G. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR. United States.
Scobel, James H, Conway, L E, and Theofanous, T G. 2002. "In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR". United States.
@article{osti_21167938,
title = {In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR},
author = {Scobel, James H and Conway, L E and Theofanous, T G},
abstractNote = {In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate design features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21167938}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
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