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Title: PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants

Abstract

Research during recent years has revealed that human errors tend to reflect the quality of performance shaping factors (PSFs). Therefore, from the viewpoint of reducing human error, PSFs, which include error-likely equipment design, written procedures, and other factors, must be analyzed and improved. This paper provides methodologies to identify and qualify the potential PSFs included in tasks at a nuclear power plant (NPP). The methodologies were applied to actual plants. (authors)

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Power and Plant Systems Dept., Industrial Electronics and Systems Lab., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., 8-1-1 Tsukaguchi-Hommachi, Amagasaki City, Hyogo, 661-8661 (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Nuclear Society, 555 North Kensington Avenue, La Grange Park, IL 60526 (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
21167796
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICAPP'02: 2002 International congress on advances in nuclear power plants, Hollywood, FL (United States), 9-13 Jun 2002; Other Information: Country of input: France; 9 refs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; DESIGN; EQUIPMENT; ERRORS; HUMAN FACTORS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PERFORMANCE

Citation Formats

Satoko Sakajo, Takashi Nakagawa, and Naotaka Terashita. PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Satoko Sakajo, Takashi Nakagawa, & Naotaka Terashita. PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants. United States.
Satoko Sakajo, Takashi Nakagawa, and Naotaka Terashita. Mon . "PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21167796,
title = {PSF Analysis Support System for Nuclear Power Plants},
author = {Satoko Sakajo and Takashi Nakagawa and Naotaka Terashita},
abstractNote = {Research during recent years has revealed that human errors tend to reflect the quality of performance shaping factors (PSFs). Therefore, from the viewpoint of reducing human error, PSFs, which include error-likely equipment design, written procedures, and other factors, must be analyzed and improved. This paper provides methodologies to identify and qualify the potential PSFs included in tasks at a nuclear power plant (NPP). The methodologies were applied to actual plants. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2002},
month = {Mon Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2002}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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