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Title: Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

Abstract

The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project,more » being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete storage space to allow the radioactivity to decay. For transport of reactor compartments at the shipyard, at the dock and at the storage facility, hydraulic keel blocks, developed and supplied by German subcontractors, are used. In July 2006 the first stage of the reactor compartment storage facility was commissioned and the first seven reactor compartments have been delivered from Nerpa shipyard. Following transports of reactor compartments to the storage facility are expected in 2007. (authors)« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - D-12200 Berlin (Germany)
  2. Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), Scharnhorststrasse 34-37, 10115 Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Three Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990 (United States); Technological Institute of the Royal Flemish Society of Engineers (TI-K VIV), Het Ingenieurshuis, Desguinlei 214, 2018 Antwerp (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Society (BNS) - ASBL-VZW, c/o SCK-CEN, Avenue Hermann Debrouxlaan, 40 - B-1160 Brussels (Belgium)
OSTI Identifier:
21156298
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ICEM'07: 11. International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management, Bruges (Belgium), 2-6 Sep 2007; Other Information: Country of input: France; 16 refs.; Proceedings may be ordered from ASME Order Department, 22 Law Drive, P.O. Box 2300, Fairfield, NJ 07007-2300 (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BAYS; BIOLOGICAL SHIELDING; COMPARTMENTS; CONCRETES; DECOMMISSIONING; PROGRAM MANAGEMENT; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; RADIOACTIVITY; STORAGE FACILITIES; SUBMARINES; SURFACE TREATMENTS; WELDING

Citation Formats

Wolff, Dietmar, Voelzke, Holger, Weber, Wolfgang, Noack, Volker, and Baeuerle, Guenther. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Wolff, Dietmar, Voelzke, Holger, Weber, Wolfgang, Noack, Volker, & Baeuerle, Guenther. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia. United States.
Wolff, Dietmar, Voelzke, Holger, Weber, Wolfgang, Noack, Volker, and Baeuerle, Guenther. Sun . "Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21156298,
title = {Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia},
author = {Wolff, Dietmar and Voelzke, Holger and Weber, Wolfgang and Noack, Volker and Baeuerle, Guenther},
abstractNote = {The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete storage space to allow the radioactivity to decay. For transport of reactor compartments at the shipyard, at the dock and at the storage facility, hydraulic keel blocks, developed and supplied by German subcontractors, are used. In July 2006 the first stage of the reactor compartment storage facility was commissioned and the first seven reactor compartments have been delivered from Nerpa shipyard. Following transports of reactor compartments to the storage facility are expected in 2007. (authors)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Large-scale decommissioning of Russian nuclear-powered submarines (NPS) and their utilization prospects gave rise to numerous complicated scientific and technical, as well as economic, problems. Problems of handling of radioactive equipment from the reactor compartments (RC) are among the vital ones, arousing a growing concern with the public. Without solution of the problems the processes of NPS utilization can not be considered completed. It involves potential hazard, for the environment both from NPS being paid up (temporal on-float storage) with unloaded spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and RC, cut from submarine hull, containing highly radioactive equipment and materials but no SNF. Diversemore » variations of the concept of reactor compartment handling of NPS subject to, utilization are possible, but, in principle, there are essentially two variants: (1) RC utilization directly in the course of NPS utilization, envisaging removal of radioactive equipment from the reactor compartment and its cutting; (2) RC utilization after preliminary long-term storage of radioactive equipment of nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) in the standard sites within RC, when radioactivity of SGF equipment and materials as a result of natural decay of radionuclides is reduced to the values permitting RC cutting without employment of special means. When analyzing this or that variant of the concept, various factors are to be allowed for. First and foremost, the technology of RC handling is to provide: (1) minimum amount of radioactive wastes; (2) minimum radiation burden to the environment and personnel; (3) minimum material and financial expenditures; and (4) maximum radiation and ecological safety. RDIPE in cooperation with the leading enterprises of RF Minatom, Goskomoboronprom and Ministry of Defense has developed a concept of handling radioactive equipment in NPS reactor compartments, and its principle concepts are presented here.« less
  • The main problems arising in decommissioning nuclear-powered submarines (NPS) relate to choosing a concept of handling reactor compartments followed by handling technology development. Reactor compartments (RC) are characterized with extremely space-saving or integral layout of large-size power equipment and systems, restricted access for dismantling, high radiation dose rates in a number of bays of RC. The above RC features pose a problem to find optimum option of RC utilization which on the one hand would be the most cost efficient, and the safest as possible on the other, i.e. dose commitments of personnel involved should be minimum, and effect onmore » population and environment should be negligible. The main radiation factors specifying safety in RC handling at any decommissioning stage are as follows: (1) total radioactivity integrated in reactor facility (RF); (2) distribution of this radioactivity through RF equipment and structures; (3) forms the radioactivity exists in; (4) radionuclide composition and time decay of radioactivity integrated in RF; (5) radiation conditions at a NPS and dose commitments when work performing; (6) possible radioactive wastes; (7) influence of the technology chosen on population and environment. The radiation factors under consideration have been the basis to develop a RC handling concept for NPS decommissioning.« less
  • Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of modifying its nuclear materials storage facility to a long-term storage configuration. In support of this effort, we examined technical and administrative means to extend periods between physical inventories. Both the frequency and sample size during a physical inventory could significantly impact required sizing of the non-destructive assay (NDA) laboratory as well as material handling capabilities. Several options are being considered, including (1) treating each storage location as a separate vault, (2) minimizing the number of items returned for quantitative analysis by optimizing the use of in situ confirmatory measurements, and (3)more » utilizing advanced monitoring technologies. Careful consideration of these parameters should allow us to achieve and demonstrate safe and secure storage while minimizing the impact on facility operations and without having to increase the size of the NDA laboratory beyond that required for anticipated shipping and receiving activities.« less