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Title: Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

Abstract

For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21152488
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1034; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: NRE-VIII: 8. International symposium on the natural radiation environment, Buzios, RJ (Brazil), 7-12 Oct 2007; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2991261; (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CALIBRATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; NATURAL RADIOACTIVITY; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADON; RADON 222

Citation Formats

Ishikawa, Tetsuo, Tokonami, Shinji, Kobayashi, Yosuke, Sorimachi, Atsuyuki, Yatabe, Yoshinori, and Miyahara, Nobuyuki. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2991261.
Ishikawa, Tetsuo, Tokonami, Shinji, Kobayashi, Yosuke, Sorimachi, Atsuyuki, Yatabe, Yoshinori, & Miyahara, Nobuyuki. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2991261.
Ishikawa, Tetsuo, Tokonami, Shinji, Kobayashi, Yosuke, Sorimachi, Atsuyuki, Yatabe, Yoshinori, and Miyahara, Nobuyuki. 2008. "Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2991261.
@article{osti_21152488,
title = {Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities},
author = {Ishikawa, Tetsuo and Tokonami, Shinji and Kobayashi, Yosuke and Sorimachi, Atsuyuki and Yatabe, Yoshinori and Miyahara, Nobuyuki},
abstractNote = {For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2991261},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1034,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 8
}
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