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Title: The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti

Abstract

PGNAA is a very widely applicable technique for determining the presence and amount of many elements simultaneously in samples ranging in size from micrograms to many grams. PGNAA is characterized by its capability for nondestructive multi-elemental analysis and its ability to analyse elements that cannot be determined by INAA. By means of this PGNAA method we are able to increase the performance of INAA method. A facility has been developed at Institute for Nuclear Research-Pitesti so that the unique features of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis can be used to measure trace and major elements in samples. The facility is linked at the radial neutron beam tube at ACPR-TRIGA reactor. During the PGNAA-facility is in use the ACPR reactor will be operated in steady-state mode at 250 KW maximum power. The facility consists of a radial beam-port, external sample position with shielding, and induced prompt gamma-ray counting system.Thermal neutron flux with energy lower than cadmium cut-off at the sample position was measured using thin gold foil is: {phi}{sub scd} = 1.10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}/s with a cadmium ratio of:80.The gamma-ray detection system consist of an HpGe detector of 16% efficiency (detector model GC1518) with 1.85 keV resolution capability. The HpGemore » is mounted with its axis at 90 deg. with respect to the incident neutron beam at distance about 200mm from the sample position. To establish the performance capabilities of the facility, irradiation of pure element or sample compound standards were performed to identify the gama-ray energies from each element and their count rates.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti-Mioveni, 115400 (Romania)
  2. University Babes-Bolyai, Cluj-Napoca(Romania)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21152372
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1036; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 1. international workshop on proficiency testing in applications of the ionizing radiation and nuclear analytical techniques in industry, medicine and environment, Bucharest (Romania), 6-9 Oct 2008; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2979079; (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACPR REACTOR; EFFICIENCY; GAMMA DETECTION; GAMMA SPECTRA; HIGH-PURITY GE DETECTORS; IRRADIATION; KEV RANGE; MULTI-ELEMENT ANALYSIS; NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; NEUTRON BEAMS; PERFORMANCE; PROMPT GAMMA RADIATION; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; RADIOLYSIS; RESOLUTION; STANDARDS; THERMAL NEUTRONS

Citation Formats

Barbos, D., Paunoiu, C., Mladin, M., and Cosma, C. The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2979079.
Barbos, D., Paunoiu, C., Mladin, M., & Cosma, C. The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2979079.
Barbos, D., Paunoiu, C., Mladin, M., and Cosma, C. 2008. "The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2979079.
@article{osti_21152372,
title = {The Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at ICN-Pitesti},
author = {Barbos, D. and Paunoiu, C. and Mladin, M. and Cosma, C.},
abstractNote = {PGNAA is a very widely applicable technique for determining the presence and amount of many elements simultaneously in samples ranging in size from micrograms to many grams. PGNAA is characterized by its capability for nondestructive multi-elemental analysis and its ability to analyse elements that cannot be determined by INAA. By means of this PGNAA method we are able to increase the performance of INAA method. A facility has been developed at Institute for Nuclear Research-Pitesti so that the unique features of prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis can be used to measure trace and major elements in samples. The facility is linked at the radial neutron beam tube at ACPR-TRIGA reactor. During the PGNAA-facility is in use the ACPR reactor will be operated in steady-state mode at 250 KW maximum power. The facility consists of a radial beam-port, external sample position with shielding, and induced prompt gamma-ray counting system.Thermal neutron flux with energy lower than cadmium cut-off at the sample position was measured using thin gold foil is: {phi}{sub scd} = 1.10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}/s with a cadmium ratio of:80.The gamma-ray detection system consist of an HpGe detector of 16% efficiency (detector model GC1518) with 1.85 keV resolution capability. The HpGe is mounted with its axis at 90 deg. with respect to the incident neutron beam at distance about 200mm from the sample position. To establish the performance capabilities of the facility, irradiation of pure element or sample compound standards were performed to identify the gama-ray energies from each element and their count rates.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2979079},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1036,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 8
}
  • A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility has been developed at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). The facility utilizes a focused cold-neutron beam from the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS). Some of the design features, expected performance, and intended applications are summarized.
  • A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.
  • Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of allmore » major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.« less
  • A programme of metabolic and nutritional research is being undertaken in critically ill patients requiring intensive care. Central to this research is the measurement of the three nutritionally important compartments of body composition, protein, fat, and water by a combination of tritium dilution and prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA). In this paper a calibration technique is presented that enables absolute estimates of total body nitrogen (TBN) to be made using prompt gamma IVNAA in critically ill patients with gross abnormalities in body composition, especially in their state of hydration. This technique, which is independent of skinfold anthropometrymore » and does not make a priori assumptions about the ratios of major body compartments, has been applied to 41 normal volunteers and the derived values for nitrogen compared with values obtained by applying three currently used calibration methods to the same experimental data. The empirical equations relate TBN in normal people to age, height, weight and sex. The mean ratios of experimental to predicted TBN (with SEMs) are 1.013 +/- 0.017 and 1.002 +/- 0.014, respectively. Mean values of the ratio of TBN to fat-free mass (0.0340 +/- 0.0004) and of total body water to fat-free mass (0.716 +/- 0.002) agree closely with values reported elsewhere for normals by a variety of techniques including chemical analysis. Finally, TBN results based on the four different calibration methods are presented for five surgical patients, demonstrating the importance of the calibration method on estimates of TBN in patients with abnormal body composition. It is concluded that this technique will provide accurate estimates of the total body content of protein, water, and fat in intensive care patients.« less
  • A relatively simple and inexpensive prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been constructed at the 5-MW MITR-II research reactor. The analytical beam is obtained by diffraction using a multilayer graphite monochromator placed in the white beam of one of the MITR-II beam tubes. Use of a diffracted beam, with its concomitant reduction in sample flux compared to the direct beam from the reactor moderator, was initially dictated by the need to construct rapidly and inexpensively an analytical facility that could analyze {sup 10}B at the level of a few micrograms per gram in biological samples. By relatively simple modificationsmore » to an existing two-axis neutron spectrometer, we were able to produce a useful intensity on the sample. Furthermore, the inherent advantage of reduced background when using a Bragg diffracted beam permitted the use of short sample-to-detector distances, which compensated for the loss in slow neutron intensity in the diffraction process. The resultant facility has exceeded our initial minimum requirements for {sup 10}B analysis. In fact, the current facility provides significantly higher full-energy peak count rates than those reported for direct thermal beam facilities at reactors with twice the power of MITR-II.« less