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Title: Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works

Abstract

ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. Inmore » addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division, Golden, CO (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21149664
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 20. symposium on the application of geophysics to engineering and environmental problems, Denver, CO (USA), 1-5 Apr 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL MINES; ABANDONED SITES; USA; UNDERGROUND MINING; SEISMIC SURVEYS; VOIDS; TOMOGRAPHY; SEISMIC P WAVES; DETECTION; ABANDONED SHAFTS; ILLINOIS

Citation Formats

Kanaan Hanna, and Jim Pfeiffer. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Kanaan Hanna, & Jim Pfeiffer. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works. United States.
Kanaan Hanna, and Jim Pfeiffer. Mon . "Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21149664,
title = {Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works},
author = {Kanaan Hanna and Jim Pfeiffer},
abstractNote = {ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. In addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proceedings of Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems},
number = 1,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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