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Title: Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region

Abstract

A seismic monitoring network has recently been installed in the North Fork Valley coal mining region of western Colorado as part of a NIOSH mine safety technology transfer project with two longwall coal mine operators. Data recorded with this network will be used to characterize mining related and natural seismic activity in the vicinity of the mines and examine potential hazards due to ground shaking near critical structures such as impoundment dams, reservoirs, and steep slopes. Ten triaxial strong-motion accelerometers have been installed on the surface to form the core of a network that covers approximately 250 square kilometers (100 sq. miles) of rugged canyon-mesa terrain. Spread-spectrum radio networks are used to telemeter continuous streams of seismic waveform data to a central location where they are converted to IP data streams and ported to the Internet for processing, archiving, and analysis. 4 refs.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. NIOSH, Spokane, WA (USA). Spokane Research Laboratory
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21149662
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 20. symposium on the application of geophysics to engineering and environmental problems, Denver, CO (USA), 1-5 Apr 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL MINING; LONGWALL MINING; SEISMIC WAVES; COAL MINES; USA; DIGITAL SYSTEMS; DATA TRANSMISSION; MONITORING; COLORADO

Citation Formats

Peter Swanson, Collin Stewart, and Wendell Koontz. Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Peter Swanson, Collin Stewart, & Wendell Koontz. Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region. United States.
Peter Swanson, Collin Stewart, and Wendell Koontz. Mon . "Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21149662,
title = {Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region},
author = {Peter Swanson and Collin Stewart and Wendell Koontz},
abstractNote = {A seismic monitoring network has recently been installed in the North Fork Valley coal mining region of western Colorado as part of a NIOSH mine safety technology transfer project with two longwall coal mine operators. Data recorded with this network will be used to characterize mining related and natural seismic activity in the vicinity of the mines and examine potential hazards due to ground shaking near critical structures such as impoundment dams, reservoirs, and steep slopes. Ten triaxial strong-motion accelerometers have been installed on the surface to form the core of a network that covers approximately 250 square kilometers (100 sq. miles) of rugged canyon-mesa terrain. Spread-spectrum radio networks are used to telemeter continuous streams of seismic waveform data to a central location where they are converted to IP data streams and ported to the Internet for processing, archiving, and analysis. 4 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proceedings of Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems},
number = 1,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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