skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash

Abstract

This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, whichmore » is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (eds.) [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21149608
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Geo-Denver 2007: new peaks in geotechnics, Denver, CO (USA), 18-21 Feb 2007; Other Information: russellbuhler@ou.edu; Related Information: In: Problematic soils and rocks and in situ characterization. Part of Geo-Denver 2007 - new peaks in geotechnics, proceedings of sessions of Geo-Denver 2007, by Puppala, A.J.; Hudgma, N.; Likos, W.J., CD-ROM pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FLY ASH; LIMESTONE; LIGNITE; COAL; USA; SOILS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; SHRINKAGE; SWELLING; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Buhler, R.L., and Cerato, A.B. Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Buhler, R.L., & Cerato, A.B. Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash. United States.
Buhler, R.L., and Cerato, A.B. Mon . "Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_21149608,
title = {Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash},
author = {Buhler, R.L. and Cerato, A.B.},
abstractNote = {This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, which is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: